Monday, April 8, 2013

Aebleskiver (Danish Pancake Balls)

We first enjoyed these novel pancake balls when we visited the picturesque Danish village of Solvang, California. My husband bought his own pan to make them at home before we were married. We still have that pan and enjoyed these a few weeks back.
The next time we make them we will experiment with our own flour mix instead of using Bisquick but for now here is the Bisquick recipe.


  • 5 eggs, separated
  • 2 cups bisquick baking mix
  • 3/4 cup milk
  • Butter
  • Confectioners Sugar (Icing Sugar)
  • Applesauce 
  • Fruit Syrup or Maple Syrup (optional)
  1. Separate your eggs.
  2. Beat egg whites in large bowl on high speed until stiff; set aside.
  3. Blend egg yolks, baking mix and milk in mixing bowl on low speed. Fold egg yolk mixture into beaten egg whites.
  4. Butter each cup in aebleskiver pan. Heat pan over medium heat. 
  5. Fill cups 2/3 full with batter.
  6. Cook until bubbly; turn carefully with small spatula or fork.  Cook other side until golden brown.
  7. While warm, sprinkle with sugar.
  8. Serve with applesauce and syrup if you desire. 


Note: Next time we thought it would be nice to add a little vanilla and or sugar to the batter.

35 comments:

  1. Wow, they look so good. My local cafe makes them and I often order them:)))

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  2. Those look amazing Ellen! These are new to me and I'll bet they taste wonderful.

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  3. Trader Joes in the US sells them frozen and they are delicious and easy breezy. L

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  4. where can you buy purchase the pan to cook them in? They look amazing.

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    Replies
    1. I've seen the pan in kitchen specialty stores or online...

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    2. Graham's Gifts in Chilliwack, B.C. has the pans, and if sold out can re-order and even ship out to you!

      The website is www.grahamsgifts.com
      Phone number is on the website page.

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    3. Your all forgetting the most important ingredient - ground cardamom

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  5. I am of Danish ansetry. I found a cookbook from one of the Luthern churches from mid century, it had a number of aebleskiver recipes. And aebleskiver is spelled several different ways. Our pan has come down thru the generations, I am not sure who I am going to give it to next.

    Sandra of Oregon

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  6. Oh yummy! Can you please pass me some?

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  7. Anneliese, I am not the Anonymous person of Danish ancestry, I am just a Mennonite Girls Fan. This is a "from scratch" very easy and delicious Ebelskivers recipe we use at my home. I hope you enjoy it. I have gotten some wonderful recipes from the Mennonite Girls site, and I am happy to be able to provide a good one for you! A friend in the US


    EBELSKIVERS
    Mix together:
    1-1/2 Cups Flour
    1/2 Tsp Baking Soda
    1 Tsp Baking Powder
    1/4 Tsp Salt
    Beat together with a whisk or fork:
    1 Cup Sour Milk or Buttermilk
    2 Eggs
    1 Cup Sour Cream
    (powdered sugar for dipping)

    Combine with the dry and wet ingredients and mix until smooth. Put 1 tsp oil in each space in the ebelskiver pan and heat the pan until hot before adding batter. Cook until golden brown and turn over to cook the other side until golden brown. (Can be turned with a fork or two toothpicks.)
    Serve hot, right out of the pan. Dip in powdered sugar. You can also fill the inside with apples or jam by placing a tsp of filling in the center as soon as the batter is put into the pan, then push it down into the batter a bit with a spoon.

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    Replies
    1. Thanks for sharing this Anonymous fan! :)

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    2. You are welcome! We got our Ebelskiver pan from Lehman's (online supplier of non-electric stuff). Ours is cast iron and works great. Anonymous Fan
      PS Our favorite Mennonite Girls recipes from this website are the Mexican soup for the crockpot (everyone loves it) and your recipe for salisbury steak (my daughter requests it all the time).
      Just wondering...when I was growing up, my best friend's mom used to make something called "cottage cheese pie". It was in a pie crust, somewhat like a custard, but had cottage cheese in it. Is anyone familiar with a recipe like this? It was somewhat like cheesecake in a crust, but lighter.

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    3. Me again. Just to be clear in the recipe I provided, it is 1 and 1/2 cups of flour.

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    4. As Per your request for the cottage cheese pie. We call it Quark Kuchen and here is the link
      http://www.mennonitegirlscancook.ca/2011/08/german-cheese-cake-quark-kuchen.html
      or just type in Quark Kuchen in our recipe search that will bring you to it.

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    5. Lehman's is the best place - i have a rotary egg beater that I bought from them at least 10 yrs ago - and it works like a dream. And that was when the US - Cdn exchange rate was about 50 percent (ouch! some expensive device) - but it works and i would never part with it

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  8. I bought my special pan at William-Sonoma a few years back. After seeing your picture, it's time to dig it out again and make some. I use a tsp.of jam or jelly in mine but applesauce sounds delicious too.

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  9. Thank you so much for your post. I grew up in Western Iowa where Aebelskivers are as common as pancakes. We had them almost every weekend and especially on Christmas morning. All the churches in our area would host Aebelskiver suppers. When I attended the University of Iowa just 3 hours away... no one had ever heard of them. I have several prized Griswold pans including my Grandmother's. Thanks again...

    Nancy

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  10. I've never seen anything cooked like that...so fun.

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  11. i have an antique (100 yr. old) cast iron bakepot that is an iron ring that sits over fire or grate...inside of this is a cupcake tin, two kidney shaped baking pans and a very shallow bake pan..each pan fits inside and or stacks with the center of the ring in the middle of all and there is a heavy vented pot lid that fits over all. seeing this round pancake and the pan you have makes me wonder if my bakepot might work doing the same....think i am gonna try it :)

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  12. I, also am of Danish descent - married to a Mennonite =) and grew up on these. LOVE them! No passing down pans yet, as we all still use them! This post was a nice little surprise for me. Thanks!

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  13. I had an antique pan for abou 20 years. Use it once, they stuck like crazy. Then I had some at the Bed and Breakfast up in Idaho. Now I am trying to remember if I finally gave the pan away or if it is stuck somewhere in a closet. Hmmm... There is a Trader Joe's nearby...wonder how tasty (and easy!) a bagful from there would be?

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  14. I haven't made these for so long and don't now want to make them, too delicious. I learned to make them with a yeast dough and the mandatory Scandinavian spice: Cardamom.

    Sharon

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    Replies
    1. And P.S. It is traditional to turn them with the tip of a metal knitting needle.

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    2. yes! I remember my grandma doing it that way! What a wonderful memory.

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  15. This Thread has sent me looking for my pan that has been 'resting' for a while.
    How delicious.
    They are made here at markets in Australia and are sold as Dutch Pancakes or Profitjes, I wonder if they are the same, the pan is the same and they are filled cooked, flipped and cooked on the other sdie and just toooo delicious for words and waistline!!

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  16. I have been wanting to make these kinds of pancakes but I don't have the cast iron pan. Do these have to be baked in a special pancake pan? or can you bake them in the oven in a muffin tin?

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    1. Gigi, they wouldn't be round like you see in the photo without cooking them in this pan. I've never tried this batter in a muffin tin.

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  17. What a delightful post! I went online to investigate Solvang, California and now it's on my list to go visit next time we're in Los Angeles.

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  18. Love making aebleskiver, love eating them. We usually search through the fridge and cupboards for something to fill them with - lemon curd is a favorite as are Nutella, red currant jelly, and apple butter. When done just a sprinkle of powdered sugar over the pile and they are fit for company. Bought the pan from a mail order company and it took a few uses and washings to season enough so they don't stick, but that's typical with cast iron.

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  19. My inlaws gave us a pan and the recipe when we were married, over 25 years ago. It was a family tradition to make these on New Years Day. We now have 2 pans. I've never heard of a bisquick recipe. Interesting. Our recipe is from scratch. We put cut up apples, or bananas or blueberries in ours, and dust them with powdered sugar. Yum!

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  20. ps - the Anonymous commenter who spoke of Lehman's website - she also mentions the Mexican soup recipe ---- which one is she / he referring to? Any clues?

    thank you in advance - i really like your recipes and the entire sentiment of this website. A refreshing change, makes me feel at home

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  21. Those pans with 7 "holes" were used for "evenveeltjes" (all ingredients the same weight) or "bollebuisjes" I guess translated is blouses for fullbodied boys. I think I also heard them named Profijtjes, like in the mail from the Australian commenter. In Fryslan they are filled with cheese, preferably the hard (old) Frisian cloves cheese (which is a long durable cheese, thanks also to the cloves) or a mild young cheese made of sheepmilk. They are turned with a fork, an iron knittingneedle and can be filled with jam. RThere are also pans with shallower and smaller holes, from which there are more in the pan, these are called poffertjespannen (poffen means to puff up). On carrouselfairs and the likes the pans are huge plates with shallow "holes" and it is always a spectacle to see the owner of the sellingpoint butter those plates with a brush, then puring in the batter, turning them and picking them of the plates without burning the poffertjes (or his hands). They are sold 7 or 10 or 12 on a dish of cardboard bith a dollop of butter and powdersugar. These poffertjes are about 1 1/5 inch diam. and about 3/4 inch thick and I am of course talking about the Netherlands. We make them at home too, but I am looking out at garagesales and thrift stores for the bigger 7-holes one, seems to me more like Dutch oliebollen, which are eaten on the last day of the year and sold on fairs too. I would like to fill the big ones with jam or marmalade after baking, though. DM

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  22. I ate these at my Grandmother's house on Christmas Eve for years and have carried on the tradition with my kids. My heritage is German-Danish. Grandma's version was made with raisins and she called them freddon, not sure spelling is correct. Has anyone else heard this name? To keep them from sticking in the pan oil it well.

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