Saturday, September 3, 2011

Chocolate Wafer Log


Here's a quick chocolate lovers dessert for a warm sunny evening.
Here's a recipe that is simple, delicious, and only takes a few minutes to assemble. Just in time for you to plan that last quick dessert for our long Labor Day Weekend. The chocolate lovers in your family will be coming back for more.
  • 1 box of chocolate wafers/200 grams
  • 2 cups whipping cream
  • 1/3 cup sugar
  • 1 pkg cream stabilizer
  • 1 tsp. vanilla

Stack your cookies into piles.

    1. Whip the cream till stiff, adding sugar, vanilla and stabilizer. I always add "Whip It" by Dr. Oetker, cream stabilizer, to the whipping cream which prevents the cream from separating.
    2. Spread each chocolate wafer with a teaspoon of whipped cream. (or be a bit more generous)
    3. Stack in groups of six.
    4. Place stacks end to end on plastic wrap to form a roll, pressing together lightly.
    5. Wrap and refrigerate four hours.
    6. Frost top and sides with remaining whipped topping just before serving.
    7. Garnish with a few chocolate curls.
    8. Cut into diagonal slices to serve.
    9. Makes up to 10 servings.
    Make yourself a fresh cup of coffee and enjoy a dessert on your patio.

    26 comments:

    1. Thanks for the memories - when i was a little, little girl my Grandma would help me make this, and then the two of us would enjoy it later as our special treat. Thanks for the smile.

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    2. I make this desert all the time.
      My mom used to make it.
      Simple, simple and delicious.

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    3. We always called this The Covered Wagon dessert. I'm afraid we took the easy route and just glued the chocolate wafers together with cool whip. Your way sounds even more delicious-er:)

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    4. Oh my, mom used to make it, I used to make it when our kids were young! I haven't thought of this in YEARS!! Thanks for the memories! So easy AND delicious!

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    5. Marg, I watched how my cousin made this while in Winnipeg and enjoyed it twice for dessert. I always wondered why the slices looked like they are going the other direction, but it's because you slice it an angle. Very easy and yummy dessert!

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    6. Ok, I will have to make this for sure! I remember making it when I was a teenager (25 years ago) for when the Youth Group came over. It was a big hit then. It will be perfect making this with my chocolate loving daughter.

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    7. Is cream stabilizer like Dream Whip?I might be able to find it when I head to Harrisonburg VA to see the inlaws in Dec...

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    8. Tracey, here in Boston we do not use any stabilizer, and we frost the outsid3e before we put in the fridge, wrapping loosely in wax paper. It never lasts long enough for anything to separate.

      Also, at Christmas time, we have coloted half the whipped cream red and made it in a candy can shape but alternating atacks already frosted. Or, color all the whipped cream green and make a wreath shape. You can decorate with red fruit leather.

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    9. I've never seen wafers like that. I guess I'll have to hunt more closely.

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    10. Wonderful this chocolate wafer log...have an amazing Labor weekend, hugs and blessings, Flavia

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    11. I found a website to show you what cream stabilizer looks like and it's purpose.
      http://www.prairiemoon.biz/whitcrst2pa.html
      Hopefully you will find this helpful.

      Dream Whip is another source of whipping cream only in a powder form and has powdered stabilizer in the product already.

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    12. This is such an impressive looking dessert!! Thank you for sharing it, I know I'll be making it soon.

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    13. Wondering....what is cream stabilizer? (So I'll have an idea about what to substitute.)
      This looks great for a hot weekend.

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    14. This takes me back a few years to when this was doing the rounds. I just used whipped cream without stabilizers, better than cool whip if you are not lactose intolerant. Always a winner. Remember Sex in a pan? Angharad

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    15. I have never even seen something like this. It looks wonderful.

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    16. Looks like a Granddaughter pleaser to me. Anna Olsen suggests using milk powder to stabilize whipped cream. Just a thought. Thanks for another "keeper".
      Hugs,
      Gramma Pat

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    17. I think even i could make this one, which means its fairly easy to make. Maybe someone will make this for their labor day that we are celebrating here in the states. Richard

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    18. I love your blog...It always makes me want to eat though...ha! have a wonderful day!

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    19. Love this...I remember watching my cousin Jo make this when we were younger. Made it for my own kids tonight and it has been devoured....kept a little treat back for my husband & me to enjoy later tonight! ;-)

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    20. My husbands absolute favourite! :)

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    21. We also make this regularly in our house - "wafers and whip cream" For a change, we would occasionally make it with Pantry ginger cookies.

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    22. OH, this sure brings back memories! A real favorite in our house. In the states, it's Nabisco Famous wafers that you buy. usually found right with the cookies, but occasionally they are stocked by the ice cream toppings(makes good ice cream sandwiches). It always impresses people when you slice it---looks so pretty and much more complicated than how easy it really is.

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    23. Thanks for reminding me of this! This was our absolute favorite and most requested dessert growing up. I don't think my mom used stabilizer either, but she "iced" it in whipped cream as well and let it set in the fridge--we called it Zebra cake and it never lasted long at all!
      Gonna make this again soon :)

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    24. In German, the Dr. Oetker product is called Sahnesteif or cream stiffener. Not long ago I saw a German-English vocabulary list of pantry items, and Sahnesteif was translated as cream of tartar. That makes sense when I remember my grandma always used cream of tartar in meringue so it would hold up better. I emptied an 8 gram package of Dr. Oetker to measure the contents, and it is barely less than a tablespoon (perhaps 1/4 teaspoon less). And sure enough, when I looked at the packet ingredients, it says Traubenzucker (lit. grape sugar - cream of tartar is a by-product of wine making).

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    25. In German, the Dr. Oetker product is called Sahnesteif or cream stiffener. Not long ago I saw a German-English vocabulary list of pantry items, and Sahnesteif was translated as cream of tartar. That makes sense when I remember my grandma always used cream of tartar in meringue so it would hold up better. I emptied an 8 gram package of Dr. Oetker to measure the contents, and it is barely less than a tablespoon (perhaps 1/4 teaspoon less). And sure enough, when I looked at the packet ingredients, it says Traubenzucker (lit. grape sugar - cream of tartar is a by-product of wine making).

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    26. Years ago, I would "bloom" a tsp. of unflavored gelatin in cool water, warm it until dissolved, cool it to room temperature and then add it to the half-whipped cream, continuing to whip the cream to the desired stage. Cheap, but what a process! Then I lived in Germany for a dozen years and discovered Sahnesteif! WOW. It is available on Amazon (as "Sahnesteif") as well as from a variety of other U.S. sources (where it is often known as "Whip It"). A tad expensive, but SO easy. Now I just have to hunt for the chocolate wafers!

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