Monday, January 24, 2011

Wurst Bubbat / Stir Bread with Smoked Sausage


As a child I was always happy when this was served along side a bowl of soup. The bonus is that this bread is just stirred, not kneaded. Ah soup and bread, the perfect comfort food on a cold winter's night.
  • 1 package or 1 tablespoon of quick rise yeast
  • 1 tablespoon sugar
  • 1 egg
  • 1 1/2 cups scalded milk, cooled to lukewarm
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 3 1/3 to 4 cups of four
  • 1 double link farmer sausage or about 1 1/2 lbs of your favorite smoked sausage cut in to 16 pieces.
  1. Combine all the dry ingredients including the dry yeast, with 3 cups of flour.
  2. Add the beaten egg and milk.
  3. Stir with a spoon adding enough flour to make a soft dough til it can barely be stirred anymore.
  4. Pour into a greased 9x13 pan.
  5. Add the 16 pieces of sausage to the top of the dough.
  6. Let rise about 1 hour and bake in a 350 oven for 40-45 minutes.
  7. Serve warm or cold.

17 comments:

  1. I've never heard of such a thing, but am positive we would love it. Thanks for sharing - I will have to try it soon.

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  2. I don't remember my Mom ever making this but I did try it sometime way back. Would be delicious with a bowl of soup!

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  3. I have never had bubbat this way. I would love to come over for soup and this bubbat.

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  4. This is very good with Obstsuppe/ PlumiMoos. You can also used smoked ham instead of sausage. Thanks, Char! I'd come over with Kathy if I could.

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  5. Isn't this funny...I just made Bubbat yesterday for the first time.
    My husband had never had it before.
    But here is another great version. It look simple and easy enough to have the products in one's pantry.
    Like you said, It becomes a perfect comfort food in my category.

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  6. i have never had this before! i cannot imagine disliking it though! will make it ASAP. results to follow :)

    thanks for sharing yet another lovely recipe with us
    -meg
    @clutzycooking.blogspot.com
    @myscribblednotebook.blogspot.com

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  7. This is a different form of bubbat than the one I make for chicken - But I know my family would love it. Anything with farmer sausage is always a hit.

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  9. I'll have to get my Mennonite on and make this! Next time I come to B.C. I'm buying some farmer's sausage!

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  10. I've never heard of this before but it looks really good. I ran it past the kids and they said it looks yummy so we'll give it a try!

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  11. Thanks for a wonderful blast from the past. My mom made this a lot when I was growing up and it was my favourite Mennonite food. I distinctly remember one time when Mom was out of menu ideas she asked what I'd like for dinner and I immediately said wurst bubbat. Her response was something to the effect of "really? that's easy!" I've never made it myself, but now I have no excuse!

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  12. I found the dough to be not very soft, and it got hard after an hour out of the oven. Must have done something wrong. I used 3.5 cups of flour. Maybe that had something to do with it.

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  13. Wow- thanks for this recipe! My grandmother used to make this, using rope (German) sausage cut into 2-3" pieces that she fried in a cast iron skillet and then poured the bread dough/batter over the sausage before baking. I remember the the bread soaking up the sausage drippings on the bottom, but still being wonderfully cripsy around the edges.

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  14. I did not like this dish much as a child, but I know I would love it now. We always poured pancake syrup over it and that was what made it edible for me (we ate what was served!) I will make this for my family. Thanks for bringing back memories of my Mom's cooking.
    Clare...
    P.S. My middle name is Lovella and I have never met anyone before that shares that name :)

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  15. Clare Lovella .. .I just have to say hi to you. How lovely that you would tell me of your second name. I know one other one besides you and I. Absolutely a delight.

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  16. This Bubbat supper was a staple for our 7 child family. The meat was always covered with dough and it was ham slices 3/8" thick with lots of fat or our own smoked sausage. At least twice a month and it was served with tea for all including the children who got lots of sugar,honey,milk or cream depending on availability and or preference added to the Tea (never given to children at any other time)! The sausage was cut in 3" lengths and then split and laid face down side by side, end to end on a 1/2" bed of batter and then the remaining batter was poured on top making sure the sausage pieces were pushed down under the dough. My young nephew has now taken it up a notch and he breaks one ring of smoked sausage open, pulls it apart into flake and stirs it into the bubbat batter and then follows the recipe ! ! A More Meat Diet

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  17. This is rather a Mennonite version of the British Toad~in~a~Hole. What is not to love, sausage and fresh bread! I will be doing this, and soon.

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