Thursday, November 6, 2008

Butterhorns

Butterhorns were my mom's signature baked goodie. She often made these for her Ladies group and we all were very happy when Ladies group was at our house. I was wondering if this is considered a Mennonite Food, since it isn't really a Danish. I discussed it with Anneliese and she thought it is considered Mennonite. What ever it is. . .it is yummy. My mom always put crushed walnuts on her butterhorns but I tried it with some Lemon Cheese in the center and they were quite delicious as well. You can find the Lemon Cheese Recipe here.
Butterhorns
  • 1 tablespoon yeast
  • 1 teaspoon sugar
  • 1/4 cup warm water
  • 1/2 cup milk
  • 1 egg
  • 2 cups flour
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons sugar
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 cup real butter
  1. Put the yeast and sugar in a small bowl, add the warm water and let sit 10 minutes.
  2. Measure the flour, second amount of sugar and salt into a bowl.
  3. Cut the butter into the flour using a pastry blender. You should have very small pieces of butter when you are done.. . it should look like oatmeal.
  4. Warm the milk until the chill is off.
  5. Add the slightly beaten egg to the milk.
  6. Add the yeast, milk, egg into the dry ingredients.
  7. Stir well until it all blended together. It will be a batter, not a kneadable dough.
  8. The dough will double, so move the dough to another bowl if it is not large enough.
  9. Cover the bowl with plastic wrap and refrigerate. . .at least 4 hours or overnight.
  10. Sprinkle flour on your counter.Roll the dough to 1/2 inch thick rectangle. The dough will be sticky, but. .stick with it. You can use flour to make it easier.
  11. Cut 3/4 inch strips, twist them and roll up as shown.
  12. Put the twists on a greased pan.
  13. Cover with a tea towel. Let rise about 1 hour or until doubled in size.
  14. Bake at 400 for about 10 - 15 minutes.
  15. Crush FRESH walnuts. . in the food processor or chop them very finely.
  16. Make a icing of 1 cup icing sugar, 1/2 teaspoon vanilla and enough milk to make a spreadable consistency.
  17. Ice and then dip the Butterhorns in the crushed nuts.
If you want to put some Lemon on your Butterhorns instead of crushed nuts. Put a teaspoon of Lemon Cheese in the center of your Butterhorn just before baking.
If you need to. . you can click on the collage to enlarge it for better detail.
I usually double this recipe. . .it is never big enough. They freeze very well. I put them on a cookie sheet, freeze them and then slip them into zip loc bags. To serve, allow to come to room temperature and maybe . . .freshen. . very slightly in the oven.

34 comments:

  1. These looks simply amazing Lovella. Up early this morning and I sure could use one of those with my coffee! Great addition to the collection.

    (You had me fooled....I always thot of butterhorns as 'cresent buns'. Either way..these look yummy)

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    1. I wanted to make some butterhorns, so I googled it and was surprised to find all these crescent rolls... not what I thought butterhorns were! I'm glad I found this recipe, because THIS is what I grew up calling butterhorns. Thanks, Lovella!

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  2. Lovella, these are the best looking butterhorns I've ever seen! Most of the old Mennonite ladies did not go to all that trouble to make them that fancy . . . lemon curd, nuts on the icing . . . but I sure like it! I will be surprising someone with these! Your beautiful collage tells the recipe!
    Thank you for sharing a recipe that I'm sure holds precious memories for you.

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  3. Mmmm.. those look soo good! and I'll agree with the fact that they MUST be Mennonite. I've never been to a Mennonite funeral where they weren't served ! smile

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  4. Lovella..very yummy looking and I love lemon!! I also thought butterhorns were crescent shaped. I sure will be 'forming' some like this next time I make them.
    And I haven't ever been at a Mennonite funeral where they were served. (smile) Must have to do with location..

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  5. these look wonderful as usual. i love baking especially when there is so much memory attached. my butter horns are crescent shaped and sometimes i will add guave paste to them before i roll them. i thought perhaps i should post since there where no butterhorns, but the recipe is similar. thanks for posting, that means i won't be tempted to eat then if i bake them.

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  6. Lovella, can I come for coffe? these look so good, my aunte always made these, she tried to give me the recipe but I just thought that it had to many ingredients, but with the great instructions and the beautiful pictures you have provided I will try to bake them. Like Anneliese says " thanks for keeping the precious memories going.
    alvina

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  7. I would love to sip coffee with you and enjoy your fresh butterhorns...with the lemon cheese. Isn't it fun to bake one of your Mom's signiture recipes. I'm sure your home smelt wonderful as you pulled these out of the oven. The collage is perfect. Kathy

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  8. Just like my mother's! And yes, served at many Mennonite funerals, however, they are simply ordered from the bakery, cut in 1/2 and served! Good thing the bakery knows how to make 'Mom's Butterhorns'!

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  9. I made these today and they were VERY good! I can't wait to make them again. Next time I will have to try the lemon cheese!

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  10. These look amazing and I am making them today. Two questions: When does the first rising happen? Is it while the batter is in the fridge. It didn't look double in size this morning. Should I let the dough come to room temp. before rolling it? Also. how many should one recipe make?

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  11. HI there. ..to the question about the rising. . yes, the first one happens in the fridge. . .maybe it doesn't quite double. . .but it should be close. I'm wondering if your yeast is fresh.
    Also. .about how many it makes. . .about 36 3 inch across I'd say.. sorry I don't know exactly.
    You don't have to let the dough come to room temperature. . it is easier to work with when chilled.

    All the best.

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  12. Lovella, if the dough doubles in less than 4 hours should I still wait 4 hours? I'm new to working with yeast, please forgive me if this is a silly question.

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  13. Cait. .not a silly question at all. You must have good rising dough. . .well done.
    The dough should be very well chilled and that is why you need to wait for four hours for sure. . .

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  14. I make these often, using the dough for cinnamin (sp??) buns, jam filled buns and just about anything else I can think of too!

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  15. I found your blog recently and enjoy the recipes. I tried the butterhorns and they were delicious. The dough didn't seem to rise in the fridge though but I continued anyway as I had mixed all the ingredients. They rose on the cookie sheet before I baked them and were very tender when baked. Thanks

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  16. I enjoy many of your recipes and have tried them also. My dough did not rise in the fridge...I continued making them and waiting to see if they rise before I bake them. One question...how does dough rise in the fridge?

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  17. Dough did not rise in the fridge ..Hi. .The dough will not rise as much as dough on the counter will rise nor will they puff up as much as cinnamon buns while baking. They should however rise at least some overnight. If they don't, I would suspect that it is the yeast that you used. I've made them many times as well as other refrigerator doughs and they always turn out. . so sorry yours did not.

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  18. I have had this recipe filed away for the perfect day for quite a looooong time, and finally pulled it out last night to start the overnight batter. Today I rolled the dough out and formed all the perfect little pastries, and was so excited to surprise my mum later on since these are her most favorite pastry every. However, I made a BIG MISTAKE, and put the pan of butterhorn pastries in the oven covered on "proof" to rise... (which I usually do for bread!) but this was a bad idea.... I came back to find a pan of runny gloppy melted pastry dough. (which only makes sense, once I thought about it!) After choking back my tears, I decided to let this be a lesson learned and now I'm off to the store to buy more butter to try again. Hope no one else makes the same mistake I did!
    -amy

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  19. Well ladies, I tried my hand at these again today and they turned out picture perfect... if only I'd had a camera!! Ha :) Thank you so much for sharing all your wonderful recipes and tricks of the trade.... great website!
    -amy

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  20. Found your recipe and made these this morning trying to recapture good memories from the Eatin Station where I used to live. Spot on! Thanks so much for this post. Everyone at work loved em too.

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  21. This recipe has for some reason been taken out of your Recipe File for yeast bread, possibly replaced by Butterhorn Rolls. I searched desperately for the recipe this morning and found it via a Google search which directed me to the Archives. Thought I would share that with you.

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  22. I've tried making this recipe twice and both times the dough hardly rose in the fridge even though it rose high in my cup prior to baking. If the dough id rolled out half and inch thick, I'm lucky to get one dozen rolls. The pastry is so light and lovely and would dearly love to know what I'm doing wrong. Help would be greatly appreciated.

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  23. Marie, Did you use the same yeast twice or have you used that yeast to try a different bread recipe? It could be your yeast is not fresh. Also, be sure that no dough is allowed to be uncovered and have a chance to harden during the refrigeration process.
    I hope they turn out again. OH. .and I should say that the rolls are small. They are not huge like bakery danish.

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  24. Lovella, i am going to attempt to make these today!They look delish!!
    I would like to add, that I love your website!!!
    hank allt

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  25. I never have any luck with yeast, but I am going to try these. My Mother used to buy these day old at McGavin's Bread, slice them in half butter and fry in a pan. I am having my sisters over on Sunday for Brunch and I plan on serving these. One Question you say they are about 3 inches is that before or after they rise.........not much of a baker

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  26. They are small....dainty little butterhorns. Not like the big bakery danish. You can make them larger if you like.

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  27. I tried to click on the lemon cheese and it opens up to this:Sorry, the page you were looking for in this blog does not exist.
    Anyone one else having this problem?

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    1. I am not sure what happened but you may try the curd on the lemon cheese tarts. I think it's similar ... http://www.mennonitegirlscancook.ca/2012/05/lemon-cheese-tarts.html

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  28. Brings back memories from my childhood. Mom made these occasionally when the "Gideons" met at mom and dad's. Not necessarily a Mennonite recipe; my mom got her Butterhorn recipe from her Irish sister-in-law. My favorite was topped with coconut or chopped walnuts.

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  29. I love my mom's butterhorns, so many memories! Her recipe was made with only butter, cottage cheese, flour, and salt so I'll have to make these and compare (I'll try not to eat too many but I can't promise I won't!)

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  30. Hi, Lovella, have you tried making these gluten free yet? They look wonderful and I may just give it a go! I'll let you know how they turn out! Thanks for a great recipe and the history behind it!

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  31. Baked these today and they turned out! I did refrigerate overnight - I would think a must with the tender dough. I got only 12 rolls using the twisting method - next time I will simply pinch off and flatten to achieve 15-20 rolls instead. BUT the rising worked both times and mine only took 10 minutes to turn golden brown - great recipe thanks for sharing!

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