Thursday, September 25, 2008

Italian Prune Nut Bread

Italian prunes are sweet and juicy...and perfect for a healthy lifestyle. Try them in a quick bread for a change from the ordinary.


Italian Prune Nut Bread

1 cup butter
2 cups sugar
1 teaspoon vanilla
4 eggs
3 cups flour
1 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon cream of tartar
1 teaspoon cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
3/4 cup sour cream
2 teaspoons grated orange peel
2 cups Italian prunes, pitted and chopped in 1/2 inch pieces
1 cup chopped nuts

Cream butter, sugar and vanilla until fluffy.
Add eggs, one at a time, beating well after each addition.
Combine flour, salt, cream of tartar, cinnamon and baking soda.
Blend sour cream and orange peel...
...add to creamed mixture alternately with dry ingredients.
Stir until blended.
Add prunes and nuts; mix well.
Divide between two greased loaf pans (9x5x3 inch).
Bake at 350F for 50-55 minutes
...or until wooden pick inserted in centre comes out clean.
Cool 10 minutes in pan;
remove from pan and cool thoroughly on rack.

I've made it without the nuts...it's good either way!

11 comments:

  1. This looks like a keeper for sure Judy. You are so right about prunes being healthy and they do make any baking so moist and tender. Love the combination with oranges. Yum!

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  2. Oh I just love italian prunes. . I wonder if they are available throughout Canada and the US?
    I have a bag in my fridge that I was going to cut up and freeze for wareneki. . but maybe I'll spare a few for this loaf. It looks delicious.

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  3. great recipe..you girls do a great job on your blog and make me want to try your recipes.Are Italian prunes the same as prune plums?

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  4. Wonderful bread recipe, Judy! I don't have a clue what italian plums are. I would be using prune plums. I too love the orange and prune combination!

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  5. I googled italian plums and one site told me that sometimes they are called prune plums. The pic of the italian plums looked the same as the prune plums.

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  6. Hmmm...maybe Italian prunes are only grown in our type of climate. They are a sweet-tart purple-skinned late summer plum with a free stone pit...and the best for baking. We had an Italian prune orchard on our farm when I was a kid...and they are grown extensively in the Okanagon and throughout the Pacific Northwest.

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  7. I use to have 2 trees on our hobby farm that yielded so many plums that I'd put boxes full at the end of our driveway with a sign that said 'free, help yourself.' They would disapear fast. Now I have to buy them or am treated to a free bag every so often. Yesterday I cut a bag full in half and pulled the stone and froze on a cookie sheet. They are now in a bag ready for all these fabulous recipes.

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  8. You have some wonderful recipes! I used your zesty salsa recipe and LOVED it! I added you to my favorite blog list. Karen

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  9. looks yummy and the photo is beautiful...

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  10. Yes, beautiful photo! I have lots of Italian plums right now. Just need to find time to bake!

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  11. Judy, I made this yesterday. . really yummy. I added 1/2 cup of wheat germ and 1/2 cup of oats. . .
    I also wondered about the plum measurment. . I used 2 cups of finely chopped plums. .is that what you did? I couldn't figure how to measure 2 cups of whole plums?
    Just wondering. It was very tasty. With the addition of wheat germ adn oats. . I spread butter on each slice. . makes sense doesn't it?

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