Saturday, October 27, 2012

Banana Cake with Broiled topping


This recipe (with a few changes) comes from my friend Elenore and it's one I use over and over.  It's great for using up those last few bananas that are turning dark. Because it makes two 8"x8" cakes (or one 9"x13") you can freeze one to have on hand for unexpected guests.

Cake:
  • 1/2 cup butter or shortening
  • 1 1/2 cups sugar
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla
  • 2 eggs lightly beaten
  • 2 cups sifted flour
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1 cup mashed banana
  • 1/4 cup sour cream
Topping:
  • 1/2 cup melted butter
  • 1 1/2 cups brown sugar
  • 2 1/2 tablespoons cream
  • 3/4 cup coconut
  • 3/4 cup chopped pecans or sliced almonds
Method:
  1. Beat together butter and sugar in mixer until creamy - this may take 3-5 minutes.
  2. Add vanilla and one egg and beat very well.
  3. Add remaining egg and beat again.
  4. Sift flour lightly on to waxed paper and measure out 2 cups.
  5. Place in bowl and add baking powder, baking soda and salt.
  6. Sift again.
  7. Add 1/2 of mashed banana and sour cream to batter and beat.
  8. Add 1/2 of dry ingredients beating until blended.
  9. Repeat with remaining banana and flour mixture.
  10. Beat until well blended.
  11. Divide batter into 2 greased and floured 8"x8" pans (or line pans with parchment paper) or one 9"x13" pan.
  12. Bake at 350ºF oven for about 30 minutes or until cake tester comes out dry. Cakes will spring back when you touch the tops.
  13. While cakes are baking, mix topping in a small bowl.
  14. When cakes are done, remove from oven and place topping by small spoonfuls over each cake.
  15. Carefully spread out topping to cover entire surface of each cake.
  16. Return cakes to oven and continue baking at 350º until topping begins to bubble.  This could take about 5 - 10 minutes. Watch carefully.
  17. Remove from oven and cool on racks.
  18. When cool remove from pans and serve with whipping cream or package up for the freezer if desired.


10 comments:

  1. Yummmm, bananas are spotty on the counter and no one in this house will eat them. Seeing as how it is cold and wet out this will be on today's list

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  2. I make this cake and its our favorite.

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  3. Bananas a very expensive in Alaska, so if they get past a certain stage where no one wants to eat them, I bake with them. I dare not waste them and enjoy trying new recipes with them. I like what I see and will be sure to try it someday. Ellice Matthews

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  4. when bananas get "spotty" (too ripe to eat out of hand), I put them in a ziplock and freeze them. When I have enough for a cake or banana bread, thaw them, squeeze out the banana into the batter: delicious!

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  5. What would you suggest instead of the pecans or almonds? My partner is alergic to nuts and I would rather not kill him with yummy cake :)
    - Christina

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  6. Have this cake in the oven as we speak, but am wondering why it's called "broiled" icing/frosting when the recipe says to put it back in the 350-degree oven until frosting bubbles, doesn't say to put it under a broiler.

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    1. I never noticed that ! I think originally the topping was broiled until it bubbled. Baking it is just a way to ensure it doesn't burn as quickly as it could under the broiler.

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  7. The cake is delicious and moist! My husband and I sampled it while it was still quite warm - couldn't wait! One disappointment, though: I turned the stove to broil for a little just to get the middle of the topping to bubble. That was fine, bubbled nicely in the middle very quickly - but last night the topping had become very sugary. It wasn't like that earlier in the day. Any idea why?

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    Replies
    1. I really don't know - I usually bake it rather than broil it. I do keep the cake tightly covered in the fridge if there is any leftover. It is a sweet topping for sure.

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