Wednesday, June 18, 2008

Rührei

Mennonite Scrambled Eggs...Rührei is what we called them when I was a kid. This was never a breakfast meal at our place...but rather a quick lunch or supper. I'd all but forgotten about them until yesterday when I was looking through the fridge to see what I could fix in no time flat...and rührei came to mind. This is a creamy version of scrambled eggs...rather like a cross between an omelet and a pancake. It pairs well with ham or sausage...sprinkled with freshly ground pepper and served with salsa for a little zip.

 

Rührei

  • 6 Tablespoons flour
  • 1/2 cup milk
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 6 eggs
  • 1 1/2 Tablespoons butter 
  1. Mix flour and milk into a smooth paste.
  2. Add eggs and salt and mix well into a thin batter.
  3. Melt butter in frying pan over medium heat.
  4. Pour in egg mixture.
  5. Cut and stir with spatula until completely cooked through...and until golden brown if desired.
  6. Serve hot. 
Somewhere through the years I decided I no longer needed my cast iron frying pan. What was I thinking? I have missed it often...and it didn't seem quite right making ruhrei in a T-Fal pan!

Enjoy!
 

23 comments:

  1. Oh my goodness. ..you beat me by a day. This was a meal my mom often made on Monday's wash day. I haven't made it in years but the other day. . perhaps looking through the old Mennonite cookbook. . I found the recipe and decided to post it. .
    I love how this blog is bringing back memories. I'm still going to make it . . and sprinkle a little sugar on top. . .or maybe syrup. . or maybe both. .

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    1. You can add a couple tablespoons maple syrup

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  2. Yes, Ruhrei was always a standby for a quick meal. My mom would sometimes add chunks of sausage or wieners into the batter, which was very delicious too. I have carried on the tradition in my family, and I'm glad to see it in this cookbook!

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  3. Wow..another 'oldie but goodie'..our family eats it sprinkled with sugar or pancake syrup and hubby grew up eating it with salt and vinegar.

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  4. oh our family likes this stuff.....sugar, kethup whatever, it really depends what we ae having with it. if it is just a filler between meals for my everhungry son then we eat it with sugar but served with meat with out sugar.......it is a good one

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  5. Yay! when I was reading the post I immediately thought about how we used to enjoy this with sugar! I'm glad to note that we weren't that strange after all. I guess it's something like pancakes.

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  6. Judy....my goodness. This brings back BIG TIME memories. Thanks so much for posting this. Funny how we take things for granted...never realizing that our mother's were actually cooking 'dishes' for us. I always thot this was just a quick supper idea my mom had made up! HA! Now it makes it into a 'well known' cooking blog!!!!

    Thanks! by the way...those meat buns are sooooo in demand now that I shared them at work and with friends. What to do...will have to set up a restaurant soon!

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  7. Oh the memories! I love this recipe.
    I must make some very soon.

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  8. It's 11:50 am. I ran out to the barn to get some eggs. . guess what we're having for lunch ..

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  9. My grandparents are Mennonite (from Steinbach, Manitoba) and I grew up eating ruhrei instead of normal scrambled eggs. I had no idea what regular scrambled eggs were until I went to a friend's house and thought "This can't be right! They're so runny!" Ruhrei is still my absolute favorite way to eat eggs. When my father made it, he'd sometimes use shortening or lard instead of the butter, but I think butter would be equally delicious. Thank you for bringing back some very fond childhood memories of my grandparents!
    -Janet

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  10. We love, love, love, ruhrei and always have fun trying to say it too. When the kids have friends over who have never had it and we say we're have ruhrei, they say "WHAT????". Growing up my family always ate it with watermelon as an alternative to rollkucken. My husband and kids love to add Rogers syrup. A quick and easy meal. Thanks for posting this recipe.

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  11. We love, love, love ruhrei and have some fun with friends who've never had it when we tell them what's on the menu. They just say "WHAT IS THAT?". Growing up, my family always ate it alongside watermelon as an alternative to rollkuchen. My husband and kids like to pour Rogers syrup over (but we still have the watermelon).

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  12. I grew up with it as well, at least once a week, and now I make it in my home. But instead, we make it with more flour and I like it better that way. Pour Ketchup, sugar or syrup, and you got a great meal!
    4 eggs
    1/2 milk
    salt
    enough flour to make a dough similar to pancake batter

    Fry and chop up!

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  13. It may be Christmas tomorrow, and we will be having Ruhrei and bacon for brunch. I am so enjoying the recipes on this site, have already put my name down for three of the cook books when they are published next year. These recipes are such a nostalgic and reminiscent blast from the past, I am thoroughly enjoying them.

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  14. A lady was just in my tea room and suggested this recipe for breakfast as I was describing to her at the end of a busy tourism season I'm looking for alternatives for breakfast. Glad she pointed me in this direction. I can't wait to come back and poke around.

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  15. When I was younger my Mom would make this and pluma mousse for Christmas eve. However we loved the eggs and would make them all year round only when I was small I couldn't say Ruhrei properly and started calling it egg stuff. The name has stuck and everyone in my family now calls it egg stuff. "As in I am making egg stuff does anyone want some?" Or "We should have egg stuff for lunch." I don't really like eggs and this is one of the few ways I eat them.

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  16. This recipe is missing one ingredient from the way my mother made it......1.5 teaspoons of baking powder. It makes the ruhrei so light and fluffy. I guess we all have different variations on our dear old Mennonite recipes :)

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  17. My kids and I LOVE Ruhrei, but at our place we call them sugar eggs because, when I was a kid, my mom always sprinkled them with white sugar. It may sound gross, but it's delicious. My kids will happily eat this for breakfast, lunch or supper!

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  18. I am not Mennonite but after trying scrambled eggs this way I will never eat them any other way. I was never a big fan of scrambled eggs the way we were taught to make them. Your recipe is so good and very filling. Thank you Judy for posting the recipe.
    Jan

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  19. My mom made this when we were kids and didn't really like it and infamously named it "Dead Eye". I'll have to try it again as an adult and see how it goes down.

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  20. I love Ruhrei! I grew up eating Ruhrei and it was and is still one of my favorite meals:) My family would usually put garlic dill pickle juice of the Ruhrei and, then eat the pickles together with the Ruhrei. I realize that not many people eat Ruhrei like this BUT, you know, "Don't love it, 'til you try it!":)) And, of course it has childhood memories!!

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  21. My childhood contains memories of eating this at my Grandmother's table. She always served it with a delicious rhubarb sauce mixed in to coat the Ruhrei. I remember asking for this meal whenever we went to visit her. Then later I served this dish to my children as well and they loved it as I had. Today, my daughter phoned for the recipe so she could make it for her two little boys. And so the tradition lives on. I think I will make some myself. I DO have some frozen rhubarb that I need to use up, which would make the sauce.

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  22. Apparently, my Oma always made ruhrei, but I don't remember her making them. Mom tries and adds bacon to the batter but then says they aren't as good as Oma's were. I'm going to try to make them. Fingers crossed that I will make Oma proud!

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