Wednesday, June 8, 2011

Sorrel Moos

 My Mom cooked this moos (we pronounce it mouse) in spring as soon as the sorrel would be ready to cut. And the wonderful thing was that sorrel grew fast and it would soon be ready for another cutting. She would alternate between cooking moos or summa borsht..sorrel is used for both. Either one tastes wonderful..the moos is especially delicious paired with something savoury.
Norma, my sister, asked Mom for the recipe and of course Mom didn't have a written recipe..so one day Mom cooked the moos and my sister measured the ingredients. I am so glad she did:)
Now I have my own row of sorrel plants in my garden and since they are a perennial they come up year after year and I get many cuttings all summer long. I freeze the extra to use in winter.

  • 8 cups water
  • 2 cups raisins
  • 4 cups chopped sorrel leaves
  • 6 tablespoons flour or cornstarch  
  • 1 1/2 cups milk
  • 2 cups sugar
  • 1 cup whipping cream
  1. Boil water and raisins together for 10 minutes.
  2. Add chopped sorrel leaves and bring to a rolling boil.
  3. Stir in the flour (or cornstarch) and milk which have been whisked together.
  4. Add sugar and stir until dissolved.
  5. Add cream and bring mixture to a rolling boil.
  6. Remove from heat and cool.
  7. You can eat it hot or cold..I like it both ways.

26 comments:

  1. Sounds yummy. I've been growing sorrel just because I like to chew on a leaf while in the garden and it is such a hardy plant where I live. I've never done anything with it up to now except put it in salads. I'm going to try your sorrel moos this evening. Thanks!

    Diane in North Carolina

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  2. Just looking at the picture makes my mouth water and brings back the memory when Mom & I made this together. Sure glad we did so that we can continue to enjoy this recipe for years to come. (just not sure if our children will continue it..lol)
    Hey, you got extra sorrel for this sister of yours?

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  3. Hey sister..the next cutting is yours!

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  4. My mom makes this, but without raisins. My Sorrel plant died and have yet to replace it. I now sure would like too :). I think that should be in everyone's garden. Somma Borscht, and Sorrel Moos, are so good.

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  5. Thanks for the inspiration for using sorrel. I planted some seeds last year and mostly used a little sorrel in Caesar salads. It is prolific in my garden. I found this website with a whole page of ideas to use sorrel. I'm going to start rethinking its usefulness and health benefits

    http://www.mariquita.com/recipes/sorrel.html

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  6. HI There ;Does anyone know where I could buy a Sorrel plant..I live in Wpg. around the ST/bonifce area maybe Charlotte could help me with this thanks


    did go to a few gardeners but don't sell it

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  7. Oh my goodness!! I just finished making the sorrel moos and it is so, so good. I'll be making this one often. I'm letting it cool now, but I don't know how much longer I can wait to have a bowl of it. Will it keep in the refrigerator a couple of days...assuming it makes it that long? LOL.

    Thanks for the recipe.

    Diane in North Carolina

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  8. I use sorrel like Spinach and i also pair it with Rhubarb in crisps or platz. very yummy. i'm going to have to try this recipe!

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  9. hi there; Betty R. just found some sorrel plants, now someone said you pull the stalks like you would do when picking rhubarb? hE SAID DO NOT CUT THEM BUT PULL LIKE RHUBARB

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  10. Don't remember my grandma making moos with sorrel, we always had plumme (sp) moos, which was mighty awesome. I have always used beet greens in my borscht. Next year when I do the garden again I'll have to give it a try.

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  11. Shirley..I always cut my sorrel. Do you know why it shouldn't be cut? Happy you found some plants:)

    Diane in NC..go ahead eat it warm..it's good either hot, warm, or cold. And yes it keeps in the fridge for a few days..you think you will have some that long? lol

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  12. Betty: there was a man next to me and he is the one that said no no don't cut pull like you would a rhubarb. Gee maybe like rhubarb you get the root part .just don't know about this one. he looked like he knew what he was talking about because he started to tell me what he use this for (maybe mennonite guy ) ha don't know for sure

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  13. Betty been on the internet,and they don't say anything about pulling just cut,so I guess I will be just cutting it close to the stem?

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  14. Interesting that you should post this today. I've just been talking about sorrel to a few people. My mom had a plant of it in her garden. And the great-grandchildren loved to go and pick some to chew on when they came over.

    I love summer borscht but have never heard of sorrel 'mouse'. Think I'll have to give it a try.

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  15. Hi Betty,

    We ate most of the sorrel moos warm, but I was able to put just enough for two servings in the refrigerator. We'll have it at lunch today, I expect. Two neighbors stopped by yesterday just as I was laddling up a bowl for my husband. Pride goeth before a fall, but I sure was proud of how much they liked this unusual (for them and me) dessert.

    Thanks again.

    Diane in North Carolina

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  16. does this have 'frog eggs' in it??? ;)

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  17. Kaila..don't give away secrets:) Just kidding of course..and no frog eggs!!
    Yes Shirley I cut the sorrel close to the stem and in a little while it will grow back. I get many cuttings all summer.

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  18. I emailed my parents who live a province away from me now to ask them if they had ever heard of Sorrel Moos and my dad was elated to hear about this and mentioned that his mother used to make this, so of course my mother who is a great cook will be making this for him once their sorrel is in full bloom. Thank you MGCC for being a blessing in so many ways! Two thumbs up from all of us! xo

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  19. My mom used to make this with the wild sorrel we picked in the cow pastures. So as soon as I saw ther recipe I knew I had to try it. Bought a sorrel plant and it's doing wonderfully well, so I finally got around to making it this morning. Did half the recipe and also halved the sugar as it seemed excessive to me. From tasting it hot I think the reduction in sugar was the right way to go. Would have been overly sweet with the full amount. Did anyone else make it as written, and what was the verdict?

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    Replies
    1. I agree, it's always good to cut back on sugar if possible. This recipe was the way my Mom made it. Next time I will cut back on the sugar and see what the verdict will be:)

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  20. Let your sorrel bloom and go to seed come fall! Just enjoying a bowl of zumma borscht right now!

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  21. Where or how can I get sorrel plants? I have 1 small one, but it keeps going to seed. I can't seem to find the plants or seeds to this. Thank you

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    1. I bought my seeds at a garden store. I have seen the plants at the greenhouse as well. I have 5 plants and they produce enough for fresh use and for freezing for winter. I do cut them back frequently and so get many cuttings all summer.

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  22. Not sure if my last comment went thru', but I'm looking for sorrel as well, I live in the Okanagan and can't find it anywhere. Thanks. My sister just gave me the recipe for summer borscht with sorrel and my husband and I love it! Thanks

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    Replies
    1. Have you checked your garden stores and greenhouses? Maybe a friend can divide a plant for you. We actually have some areas where the sorrel plants grow wild in the ditches.

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  23. My Mom made sheep sorrel moos in the spring. It grew wild in the fence rows here in Kansas. Have not heard of many others making it. More just like a pudding. It was good, and, I imagine, a lot like yours.

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