Thursday, May 13, 2010

Rhubarb Meringue Pie

I remember as a young girl pulling out long stocks of pink rhubarb from the garden, washing it and then asking for a little dish of sugar to dip it in. That is still a treat I have when the rhubarb is in season.
Rhubarb is the first fruit you can find coming up in the spring. If you have always wanted a rhubarb plant, but don't have the room in your yard, plant it in a big barrel or planter. I have had great success that way. Add lots of compost and you will have rhubarb to share.

When I only have enough dough for a single crust pie, I add a crumble or meringue topping.
There are many good pie crust recipes to choose from here on the blog. I use the one on the Tenderflake box. The nice thing with that recipe is it makes enough for a number of pies. I make the whole recipe, use what I want, divide the rest, flatten pieces into discs, wrap and freeze. When you need a pie crust all you do is thaw a disc roll it out and you are ready for another pie.

Ingredients:
-1 unbaked pie crust
-6 cups fresh or frozen rhubarb (if using frozen allow to sit until almost thawed)
-1/3 cup flour
-3/4 cup sugar
-1/2 tsp nutmeg
-2 eggs -separated
-2 tbsp sugar (for meringue)
-1/4 tsp cream of tartar
-1/2 tsp vanilla

Method:
Prepare and roll out pastry for a single crust pie.
In a large bowl mix sugar, flour, and nutmeg together. Separate the eggs and add the yolks to sugar mixture. Using a fork blend together and then stir in rhubarb.
Transfer rhubarb into the pastry shell and bake at 375ยบ for 35-45 minutes.

Meringue:
Beat room temperature egg whites until they begin to get frothy. Gradually add sugar, cream of tartar and vanilla and beat until mixture is thick and glossy. Once fruit pie is cooked, pile the meringue on top of hot fruit creating peeks with the back of a spoon.
Return pie to oven and bake meringue until golden. About 8-10 minutes. Stay with it so it doesn't get too brown.

Tips for perfect Meringue:
  1. Let egg whites stand at room temperature for 30 minutes before beating. This will allow for better volume.
  2. Make sure your bowl and beaters are clean and dry.
  3. Add the sugar gradually as soon as mixture begins to froth.
  4. To prevent the meringue from weeping, top the pie while it is still very hot. This helps the underside of the meringue to cook at the same rate as the top of it.


23 comments:

  1. I have fond memories of eating rhubarb with a bowl of sugar too. In my childhood wisdom I would add vanilla for good measure.

    ReplyDelete
  2. This looks fantastic but I've yet to make a sucessful meringue :( I made the lemon pie by the foot the other day and the topping failed. I used the "sugar in the raw" which is very course and maybe I need a finer sugar for this?

    ReplyDelete
  3. That looks pretty darn good! I may have to try it sometime this summer, when our rhubarb is finally up!

    ReplyDelete
  4. Sarah I would say that the sugar is important. Try using fine white sugar and whip the egg whites until they are glossy and thick.

    Kathy .. your pie looks wonderful. I picked rhubarb yesterday ..and wondered how many more pickings I'd get this season.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Thanks for the tip. I'll link back when I get a sucessful meringue. Now, to find a box of Tenderflake and make some crusts - thanks for the tip!

    ReplyDelete
  6. have never put a meringue on a rhubarb pie before, might have to give this one a try :)

    ReplyDelete
  7. This pie looks delicious Kathy! I'm loving all these rhubarb recipes.

    ReplyDelete
  8. This sounds like a very nice pie... :)

    ReplyDelete
  9. Sarah, I would suggest you use regular fine white sugar....and keep trying, you will get it! I have never used sugar in the raw for meringue, but I love it for other things. When you get the hang of it with white, you can also use brown sugar...but start with the fine white sugar. Happy baking! Kathy

    ReplyDelete
  10. Pretty pie!! I put it on my blog with a link to yours :)

    Erin

    ReplyDelete
  11. I've been working up the courage to plant rhubarb in a container for a few years. Now that I've heard your success story I think I'll go for it! Do you put rocks in the bottom to help with drainage?

    And the pie looks delish!

    ReplyDelete
  12. To those going out to look for Tenderflake... it is non-hydrogenated lard and I believe it is a Canadian product...you may have to opt for another brand of lard or shortening.
    Kathy ... I love your pies!

    ReplyDelete
  13. ohh this looks so much like the
    Rhubarb Bar cake that my mom makes!! My mother though makes it as a cake with a pre-baked Almond Shortbread crust. My favorite is the sweet meringne on top to counter the slightly sour rhubarb!!

    ReplyDelete
  14. Such a work of art that pie is...

    ReplyDelete
  15. YUM!!!! I have rhubarb in my garden this year and can't wait to give this one a try!

    ReplyDelete
  16. Rachel...I never did have rocks in my big barrel, but that is a great idea.
    Anneliese, thanks for the tip on lard for the crust...some brands are not available everywhere. Kathy

    ReplyDelete
  17. Another delicious-looking rhubarb recipe...and pies are always my favorite!

    ReplyDelete
  18. Kathy - did you start yours from seed or a plant?

    ReplyDelete
  19. this is on my list, I love rhubarb pie! thanks so much.

    ReplyDelete
  20. I think the Tenderflake recipe is 1lb. of lard, 5 1/2 c. of flour with 1/2 tsp. salt blended. Once these three are mixed to a consistency of small pea-sized pieces, in a liquid measure mix 1 egg, 1 tbsp. vinegar, 1 tbsp br. sugar and fill to 3/4 cup. Stir this into the dough. Voila! Makes lots of dough - six or more crusts, depending how you roll it.

    ReplyDelete
  21. Made this pie for my husbands birthday today. He's not a big fan of cakes, so I made him a birthday pie. Substituted half of the rhubarb for the last of the local strawberries. It was delicious! Love the use of nutmeg in the recipe too.
    Thanks again for another truly scrumptious pie!

    ReplyDelete