Saturday, July 28, 2012

Apricot Jam

This jar of sunshine contains no packaged pectin of any kind. Cooked with more fruit than sugar, gives this jam a fresh taste of apricots. It is simple to make, you just need a bit of time.

  • 12 cups of finely chopped apricots (save the pits)

  • 8 cups of sugar

  • 1/4 cup of lemon juice (the lemon juice prevents the fruit from browning and just enhances the flavor of the fruit).
  1. Combine the chopped apricots, sugar, lemon juice and let sit in the pot for 1 hour.

  2. Add a handful of pits to the pot. Don't ask why, it is just one of those things you don't question, it is just always done that way:) At least that is what I was told, Oma did it that way, mom does it that way, so I do it that way...is that a good enough reason, I sure hope so. Actually I think it adds to the natural flavor.  (I am told it is a natural pectin).

3. When the fruit comes to a boil it fill develop a foam on top. Skim of the foam and put it into a bowl. Do not discard until cool, because it has a beautiful syrup under it and can be used on pancakes.

4. Once the mixture is boiling and the foam has been skimmed off, boil on medium low for about 40 minutes or so, stirring often with a wooden flat bottom spoon to get into the corners of the pot.

5. Pour into sterilized jars with a wide mouth funnel, leaving about an inch or more of head room. I always freeze my jam instead of sealing them so you need to leave more room at the top of the jar for that.
Serve on fresh scones, toast or homemade buns. I love apricot jam, it just reminds me of home.

26 comments:

  1. Replies
    1. aha, there is a reason for adding them, thanks for letting me know. That makes perfect sense.

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    2. But the pits remain in the jam? or do they break down?

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    3. I always add pits and have not experienced them to break down.

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  2. this post reminds me of my childhood...we had an apricot tree, and each year my Menno raised Mom would put me & my sister to work pitting apricots for jam.
    She also would put some pits in the simmering fruit...now where to find a good deal on apricots...

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  3. Is the lemon juice added in the beginning, when the apricots are soaking in the sugar?

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    1. Yes Jackie, the juice would be added when the apricots are soaking to prevent them from browning.

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  4. I can remember my mom making apricot jam this way with no pectin. And I know she always added some pits into the jars when she canned apricots as well. Thanks for the memories.....Bernice J.

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  5. I assume you peel the apricots?

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    1. Nope, that would be way to much work. I like things easy :)

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  6. That looks scrumptious! Austrian fasching-krapfen is made with apricot jam.

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  7. Thanks for the recipe! I have a question, when you remove the pits?

    I heard you cannot keep preserves with pits for more than 1 year, it is dangerous, becomes poisonous

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    1. I remove the pits after the jam is completely cooked.

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  8. I read on a different site that there isn't any pectin in the pits; they're just added for flavour. It also said that apricots naturally contain a lot of pectin, and if you don't want to add any packaged pectin, just use more sugar and cook a bit longer to reach the gelling stage.

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  9. Apricot jam has always been a problem for me as it develops lumps of hard sugar after sitting awhile. I'll try doing it this way as my hubby loves apricot jam. Thanks Charlotte.

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  10. I was reading that the pits impart a bitter almond flavor t the jam.

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  11. One of the things my mom that also makes a great apicot jam is adds pineapple to it. The flavors go great together.

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  12. This sounds wonderful, using less sugar. Unfortunately, I'll have to wait until next spring to make this as apricots are long gone in my area. I make apricot-pineapple jam every year and it's our favorite. I always put pits in the jar and when I can them as well. Never knew why though.

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  13. A few mentions of our mom's. :)
    My Mom said the jam won't set unless you cooked it with the stones, (pits).
    Our dear old moms knew how to do things, not always the scientific why. Once in a while if there happened to be some left over in the fridge, Mom added a few cut up maraschino cherry.

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  14. I started making jam without pectin years ago when I lived in the Republic of Georgia - there was no pectic available in stores over there. I still make jam this way even after coming back to Canada. Use 2x's as much fruit as sugar - and your jam tastes way more like the real berry than store bought. Just boil long enough to set - but if it doesn't set as much as you like for jam - use it for ice cream topping :)

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    1. This jam has less sugar and it did not stay runny after it cooked and cooled. I can spread it nicely and it is not to thick. I would go with you on the idea that if any jam is too runny it goes good on ice cream or pancakes :)

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  15. How much does this make? I need to buy jam jars and need to know how many to buy. Oh if you are freezing them do you need to use the canning jars that seal or can you reuse recycled food jars and their lids? This looks scrumpious and I sure miss having my mamaw's home canned apricot jam. Thanks for the recipe.

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    1. I had random size jars so I can't honestly say how much this makes. I use any kind of jar as long as the jar and lid a sterile, then I freeze it.

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  16. Do you have to process the jam or do the hot jars & lids with the boiled fruit, seal good enough. How long would they last? (assuming that they wouldn't get eateb righy away...)

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  17. I just made a HUGE batch of cooked apricot jam and have a few pounds left but I'm out of canning lids. I think i'd like to use the last bit to make this freezer jam - I can re-use old lids since these don't need to be sealed, is that right?

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  18. crack the shell and place a few "seeds" to cook in the jam. These do not need to be removed but can be eaten and impart a delicious almond flavor to the jam. There is a tiny bit of arsenic in pits but you would need to eat pounds of the actual pits to be affected.

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