Monday, March 9, 2009

Paska




Lovella's Paska

There is no other recipe that has found me more friends than this one. Most of the girls who share this blog with me. ..found my personal blog by "googleing Paska". The recipe originated with my husbands Grandmother .. .but I made it simpler by utilizing my blender and thin peeling my citrus. 
The aroma just amazing .. from the time you blend the citrus . .until the last loaf has cooled.
You will need 4 or 5 loaf pans . .or you can free form little twists or use muffin tins. .. just adjust your baking time. ..watch the oven closely.


  • 2 tablespoons active dry yeast
  • 1 cup warm water
  • 1 teaspoon sugar
  1. In a large bowl, put your yeast, sugar and warm water. Let sit 10 minutes. .if it hasn't poofed up . . either your yeast is old, or dead . ..if that happens, start again. There is no point in going on without nice poofy yeast.
  • 1 medium lemon
  • 1 medium orange
  1. Take your citrus and peel it very thin. I use a vegetable peeler. You don't want to use any of the white part of the peel. Put the thinly sliced peel in the blender.
  2. Once you have removed and discarded the white pith of the citrus.. .chop your lemon and orange . .removing all the seeds. Add the chopped lemon and orange to the blender.
  • 1 1/4 cup milk
  • 1/2 cup of real butter
  1. In a microwave safe bowl, heat the butter and milk until the butter melts. .or do it in a saucepan on the stove.
  2. Once it is melted .. .add it to the blender. Start the blender .. and begin to puree.
  • 2 large eggs
  • 3/4 cup sugar
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  1. Start the blender on high and allow the citrus, peel and milk, butter mixture to run for about 2 or 3 minutes.
  2. Add the eggs, sugar and salt.
  3. Continue to run the blender for another minute or two until very smooth.
  4. Measure the milk/citrus and sugar mixture. . it should be about 4 1/2 cups. If you have a bit more or less that is fine. .you will just adjust the flour likewise.
  5. Pour the mixture, along with the yeast mixture into a large bowl .. or the bowl of your kitchen machine, which has a dough hook.
  6. Add flour. . .one cup at a time until you have a smooth soft dough .. .it will be sticky. I think about 7 cups of flour should be right. . but it will depend on the size of your eggs and the size of your lemon and orange. With a plastic bowl . .it is easy to tell when the dough has enough flour because it will stop sticking to the side of the bowl ..but with a metal bowl you really do need to stop the mixer often and touch your dough before adding additional flour. It really is best to stop the machine once it is getting close. . and knead the last bit of flour by hand. . .a little at a time until it is smooth. Do not add more than 7 1/2 cups flour. . allow it to remain sticky. If you measured the milk mixture and had 4 1/2 cups. .7 cups of flour will be enough. . .sticky but enough.
  7. The amount of flour is a guide. .if your dough is still super sticky add a little more flour a dusting at a time. Look at the picture in the collage of my dough .. .that is how it should look. It should be able to hold its shape. There will be several factors in how your dough could be different than mine. . .the flour you purchase or how you fill your cup of flour. . I scoop and shake to level. Or. . it could be that you have slightly more liquid. Dont' despair if you think it is still too sticky. . .go slow. . add a dusting more. .turn the dough on the counter and knead until you are out of flour again. .and then give it another dusting and continue this way until. . .it looks like mine in the picture.
  8. After kneading it by hand or with the machine for about 8 - 10 minutes. . .transfer to a large bowl, cover with plastic wrap, a tea towel and allow to rise until doubled. This should take about an hour. .to an hour and a half.
  9. At this point, give it a bit of a punch down and let rest at least 10 minutes or up to another hour.
  10. During this time prepare your pans. I spray mine with Pam. Make loaves and let rise until doubled in bulk .. .or about an hour to an hour and a half.
  11. Preheat the oven to 350 F. Bake the loaves about 20 minutes. .but again it totally depends on the size of your pans.
  12. Allow to cool on cooling racks. . I put them in the freezer unless we are eating them the same day . .
Paska Icing
  • 1 cup of soft real butter
  • 4 pasteurized egg whites (young children, pregnant women and people with compromised immune systems should avoid raw egg whites)  I often  use egg white powder  and water.
  • 2 teaspoons vanilla
  • enough icing sugar to make a soft icing. It will harden again in the fridge.
  1. Beat all together until light and smooth....and spread on each slice .. .and sprinkle with colored sugar.

136 comments:

  1. So fun to think about making this once again. My family was so impressed with me last year. This year, I have my beloved to impress and I know that this will do it.

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  2. yay..it is paska time.....yuppers if it wasn't for this recipe i would be without all my bloggy friends....thanks lovella! who would of thought i could be blessed like that!!!!

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  3. Lovella..this Paska recipe brought us 'cooking girls' together! It's a blessing for sure!!
    Can hardly wait to make Paska again and as you said Lovella..the kitchen smells amazing as the paska bakes!

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  4. Wow...sounds wonderful! I'll have to give this one a try, Thank you!

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  5. We LOVE Paska! well, I do, and I'm going to force everyone in the house to love it too! lol Now to only figure out a GF version... (JULIE??? hehe)

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  6. I grew up with paska, but didn't really love it until I got this recipe from you many years ago. I have to tell you that I made a small recipe with my grandson watching me, while in Indonesia (last week) and this 4-year-old boy was excited!!! He remembered having paska while in Canada last Easter and as he sat on the counter now and I mixed, he said, "it smells like Pask already!" (I did tell him that it's called paska and he made sure his Mom knew it too.)

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  7. Just keeping us on our toes Lovella.
    I feel like I should be baking Christmas cookies with this weather, but meanwhile the twinkles of spring are coming soon.....and we'll all be whipping up a storm of Paska.

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  8. I've never seen Paska with citrus in it. My mother's recipe has 9 eggs and a tad more butter. I'll have to try this one in addition to Mom's, it looks delicious. BTW, my mom's also tended to be dry. Now I make smaller loaves and bake it for less time.

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  9. You can use pasteurized shell eggs for making the icing. They're just like any other egg, but they've been treated in warm water to eliminate salmonella from the inside of the egg.

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  10. You are right Lovella, it was almost exactly this time a year ago that I read your recipe on your blog and yep...this brought us all together...breaking bread together...baking bread together....grin.

    I just made Paska this past weekend....had to make it early as I tried a friend's mom's recipe...quite a bit different that what I was used to so I wanted to see the difference. I must say...your recipe is tops! And so like my mother's...so it must be best!

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  11. I love paska..your pictures are great and I am longing for the smell drifting through the house.This is the recipe I will be using this year...looks great.

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  12. Lovella...when friends ask me what kind of paska recipe I use...I now refer them to your site. Tried your recipe for the first time last Easter and we love it!

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  13. Oh! Thank you SOOOOOOO much for this recipe! I have been WAITING for someone on here to post about Paska! And I have been looking for a recipe that sounds like the one my mom makes, but doesn't require 2 dozen eggs, and a deep freeze to keep the loafs in (ie, suitable for a mennonite like me who doesn't have mennonite in-laws, and a husband who doesn't care for the stuff). I CANNOT WAIT TO TRY THIS! You have no idea how excited I am. I haven't had Paska in three years!
    -Kathryn

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  14. I love this recipe, I had never heard of Paska until last year from Lovella's Blog.

    My boys thought I was a queen for making it, can't wait to make it again this year for our family Easter tradition!

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  15. BEST paska recipe EVER... will make this again and again- thanks Lovella

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  16. Oh it's that wonderful time of year!!

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  17. I have just made Paska for the first time using your wonderfully detailed recipe. It turned out great and my family is already wanting more!!
    Sheri B.

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  18. I really would like to make this bread today but i'm wondering if anyone can tell me at what point i add the yeast mixture??

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  19. I would like to try this recipe today but could anyone tell me when to add the yeast mixture??

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  20. Angela. .thank you for pointing out that ommision. I corrected it. Add the yeast into the large bowl along with the citrus and warm milk and eggs before adding flour. Let us know how it turns out . .

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  21. I initially found this site searching to find what portzelky were and I'm so glad I found it! I've made several of the recipes (the maple twists are delightful!) and just had to try the paska. I am not Mennonite, but Baptist, so I have had no exposure to many of these traditional foods... but the paska is AWESOME! Such great texture and flavor. I think it would also be lovely as a braided ring for an Easter brunch. Thank you for sharing your faith and your recipes. I so enjoy this site!
    Melissa from Lynden, WA

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  22. I think I am going to give this a try too! Paska is my favourite Easter treat - our church (Mountain Park) serves it before the Service on Easter Sunday every year - that's the only time I get it since I didn't grow up with this wonderful tradition...
    but I can begin this tradition in my family now with this recipe! Thanks! can't wait to try it!

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  23. Ok, I did it! I made them! YUM!
    I kept wondering if the dough was supposed to be as sticky as it was... didn't make for kneading with my hands at the end very fun... but I didn't want to add too much more than the 8cups of flour ~ it turned out great though! Thanks!
    Thanks so much Lovella!

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  24. Ok, I did it! I made them! YUM!
    I kept wondering if the dough was supposed to be as sticky as it was... didn't make for kneading with my hands at the end very fun... but I didn't want to add too much more than the 8cups of flour ~ it turned out great though! Thanks!
    Thanks so much Lovella!

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  25. I had never heard of Paska before but when I saw the picture I knew my husband would love it.... and boy did he as did my father! All the loaves were gone in 2 days and they are begging for me to make more. I love the fact that is was really so easy to make.

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  26. My best friend Jen made this recipe last week and it was so delicious, better than any i've ever had (sorry to my mother-in-law). Now that I have an orange, I am going to give it a try.

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  27. I made 2 big loaves, 3 mini loaves and a dozen muffin sized rolls with the paska dough - they turned out great! I kept the dough on the moist side and the bread is moist, rose very high and tastes great. My 10 year old daughter says, "it tastes like spring!" I agree wholeheartedly! Thank you for this lovely recipe.

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  28. I was looking for a recipe that wasn't so dry. That was the only way I remember Paska as a kid. I saw Lovella's recipe and decided to try it. WOW!!!!! the best ever. My house still smells like Paska and the loaves are going quickly. It was so easy and quick and not so many eggs like I remember my moms had. I am making another batch before Easter yet. Thanks. Irene

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  29. Lovella - Jen here, again!
    A non-Mennonite Friend and I (non-mennonite) are wondering if Paska has any "meaning" behind it for being such a special bread at Easter... is there a story? Do you know?
    Thanks!

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  30. Just wanted to vouch for this recipe too. I finally made it this afternoon, and SUCCESS! It smells so wonderful, and even my picky sis-in-law liked it (she hates orange peel in things). I am not an accomplished baker by any means, and I was nervous to attempt something like this, but it worked out so perfectly. I posted some photos on my blog too. Thanks so much for this recipe, as I was convinced I would be without Paska once again this year.

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  31. What did I do wrong?
    I have been baking paska for years but thought I would try this recipe.
    Everything went well and the paska baked well.
    However when cut the paska even though the paska looked done it was quite soggy and heavy.
    The flavour is great.
    Baffled

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  32. Dear Baffled. Oh I am so sorry that your paska was heavy and soggy. That is certainly not how it should be, should it? I wonder if you maybe the oven was a touch hot, creating the illusion that the paska was browned therefore baked through. Otherwise, I have no idea. .I made it again today. .and it is light as a feather .. I am so sorry.

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  33. I am loving your website and all of your beautiful recipes! I am very excited to try the Paska recipe but I am wondering if you can freeze half of the dough? Thank you and happy spring!

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  34. I actually have never tried freezing the dough .. .I would perhaps try to form into loaves or small buns on a cookie sheet after their first rise, freeze them and then put them in plastic bags to be kept frozen. . then take them out and put them in pans or cookie sheets to allow them to rise.
    .

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  35. Hi Lovella;
    I thought it was about time to comment as I have been reading your blog for 2 years now; I too came across it while searching for a mennonite paska recipe and have been reading it ever since. Today I am making this paska once again as it has turned out to be very yummy the last two years that I have made it. Thank you so much for this delicious recipe. I have emailed you before, but I have never left a comment before. Thanks again.
    Eva

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  36. We love Paska but all those old recipes had to many eggs, to much sugar and then the cream..... so when I found your recipe on March 7 2007, I was delighted with yours and the results were fantastic. I only changed one thing because I was told that potato water was good for paska. Thanks for sharing from your heart......sf

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  37. My Paska is rising and all is right with the world... Yes, seven cups or very nearly that was what I used...on my recipe you apologized for not measuring so I just started with five and worked my way up. I can hardly wait to have some of this tonight!

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  38. I am interested to try Lovella's Paska receipe I have tried to print it but only the lst page prints. Can you help me I have tried it several times. I love all these receipes I married into a mennonite family, Lori

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  39. I have always wondered why I couldn't get the icing the way my Mennonite Mother-in-law made it, my husband was never happy with it always said wasn't like his Mom's, well thanks Lovella when I read your recipe I said that is it she used the white of an egg with the icing sugar makes all the difference so thank you success at a last.

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  40. HI Lori,
    Oh . .I know about the icing. . it is so yummy, no other icing is good enough for my family too.
    I had one other gal email me telling me that she was unable to print recipes .. . but I just printed one out and it worked fine. . it might be your settings. . sorry I am not that computer savvy to be of much help. Try to copy and paste onto word and print it that way. That is the best I can offer.

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  41. I have never made paska before and I made this today and followed the directions and it looked done after 22 minutes.The loafs were nice and high but seemed to fall as it was cooling. The icing seemed to separate also. It tastes great though and I am wondering if the doe was too sticky and maybe it wasn't totally done? Your thoughts?

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  42. Ah .. so sorry your loaves fell .. probably the your oven browned them sooner and they should have stayed in the oven a bit longer. .that has happened to me as well, if my loaves were bigger. . and the icing? I'm not sure. . that hasn't happened to me. .maybe you just needed more icing sugar .. I'm sorry.

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  43. I was raised on Paska every Easter but have never attempted making my own. With this great recipe I may have to attempt it this year!

    Thanks for the inspiration!

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  44. Paska (or Pascha in Greek) means Resurrection. I thought someone might appreciate that tidbit of information. :) I grew up having (and loving) this stuff in my Mennonite background family's Easter tradition. When I became an Orthodox Christian, I discovered that all the Russians and Ukrainians do this as well! (Although most of the time the Orthodox Pascha (or Easter) is at a different time than the "West", kind of like Ukrainian Christmas is different. I guess the Mennonites have a lot of Ukrainian and Russian influence though. :) ) Thanks so much for the recipe as I love to try different ones!

    Roxanne

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  45. Could you please tell me approx. how much icing sugar you use for the icing? Looking forward to making Paska! thank you.

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  46. About the icing sugar amount .. .
    I would say maybe about 1 1/2 pounds. . but really. . you need to make it a soft icing and remember that it will harden in the refrigerator becuase the butter will harden.
    Next time . .I'll measure. .just for you!

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  47. Quick question...Do you have a standard oven, or do you have a convection oven?

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  48. About the OVEN... I do have a electric oven with a convection option. I do often use it for bread baking and it cuts down on the baking time and then I usually bake it a bit slower .. like 325. I have used this same recipe for 30 years before I had a convection. Every oven is different and often times ovens are off on their temperature settings.

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  49. Okay. So my paska is in the oven....and I'm chuckling and giggling....
    Question: When you measure out your flour, do you SCOOP it with the measuring cup, or do it the proper way--pile it softly into the cup and level it?? Well, because of my history with making paska :P, I thot I'd do it the 'proper' way and I really had to exercise constraint not to add more than 7 1/2 cups. So, it WAS sticky! But I had to spoon it into the pans--3 only half full. Of course they rose! But to look like a gramma's saggy tummy! Oh my!! What to do?? Bake 'em!! If they are inedible--Through NO FAULT of the lovely recipe blogger!!!--I shall use it like the loaves in my freezer from last year....I feed them to the chickens who later lay Easter Eggs!!
    Fear not! I SHALL try again! I mean it works for SO many others! Barring that--Do you ever sell your paska?????

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  50. Well! A follow-up...to the post about my paska misadventures....My paska is done!! It looks hilarious! But it tastes HEAVENLY!!!

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  51. Thankyou so much for posting this recipe. My mother in law made the best paska I ever had but since she died 9 years ago and no-one had the recipe so I had no clue what the ingredients were. I knew she had used lemons and oranges and when I tried this recipe it was exactly what her's tasted like. So thank you so much. I love to make small loaves and give them as gifts.

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  52. My mother in law made the best Paska I had ever had but when she passed away it was like that recipe died with her because no-one had the recipe. She always just baked from the top of her head, with out recipes. So I was looking through these recipes and I found this recipe and it sounded so much like hers because of the oranges and lemons so I tried it and, oh my word, it was exactly like her's. So thank you so much.

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  53. Could one go through your steps to the milk/citrus and sugar mix stage then instead of using a mixer pour the mixture into a bread machine and add the flour and set the breadmaker to the "dough cycle", letting the machine mix and initially rise the dough? Then one would remove the dough, punch it down and set in pans and continue as you direct? I cannot knead anymore and my bread machine allows me to still enjoy home made bread.
    Sharon

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  54. Could one go through your steps to the milk/citrus and sugar mix stage then instead of using a mixer pour the mixture into a bread machine and add the flour and set the breadmaker to the "dough cycle", letting the machine mix and initially rise the dough? Then one would remove the dough, punch it down and set in pans and continue as you direct? I cannot knead anymore and my bread machine allows me to still enjoy home made bread.
    Sharon

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  55. I tried this recipe for the first time and I too had it "fall" after baking. I'll try it again though for a little longer, with a slower oven because it tastes LOVELY! Thank you very much. I'm Mennonite but apparently our branch missed the Paska tradition - I think I'll be starting it afresh! ~Ang

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  56. Update... I made this recipe 2 days ago and turned out perfectly!! It is THE most delicious Paska I have ever had. I think I'm allowed to say that because it's not my recipe! :) I have shared with family and friends and they love it too! Thanks so much for sharing your recipe and giving such a detailed account of directions.

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  57. I was wondering if someone could help me in halfing this recipe? I dont think I could eat 4-5 loaves and I am worried my family wont like it. Is it possible to half it?

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  58. for Sharon: If your bread machine is large, this should work just fine on your dough setting. the bread machine yeast does not need to be proofed, so just put everything into your machine and start the dough cycle. Check it several times to make sure it's not too wet or too dry. You may need to reduce the amounts if your machine can't handle this much dough.

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  59. Such good paska!! We enjoyed ours last night - I said it tasted like cake! I formed little buns close together in a spring form pan and they rose so high that it looked like a big bumpy cake in the end. I sliced through it (horizontally) like you would for a cake. Spread it with icing and then put some on top with sprinkles. I know this will go over well for our kids, who always want extra icing.
    I have a hard time remembering to count cups of flour, but I mixed twice and came to the conclusion that if you measure your liquids, your flour would be times 1.5 (eg. 4 cups liquids, 6 cups flour)I use unbleached flour.
    It is tempting to take them out of the oven once they look slightly brown, but try to keep baking them at 325F at least another 5 - 10 min. to be sure they are done and don't end up falling. Extra small loaves, may be a good start for beginners.
    For the icing I used about 4-5 cups confectioners sugar or 1-1/4 cups per 1/4 cup butter and each egg white. It turns out better if you beat the egg whites first and then add the sugar and soft (not melted)butter.
    On sprinkles - there are two kinds - the hard round ones and the little stick like ones that tend to be softer - not crunchy. You have a choice there too.
    Thank you Lovella, for not only freely sharing this recipe, but trying hard to help make it a success for all.

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  60. Thank you Lovella for making the instructions so clear and easy for us no so advanced cooks! I really appreciate the time you have put into that and for sharing it with us! Made it for the first time yesterday and it is tasty. Unfortunately, I don't think I baked it long enough :-( But we are still going to enjoy it! Just curious about the icing - can you freeze iced or is it best to ice them after they come out of the freezer?

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  61. i made this recipe today and i think it's a success! smells real good - i baked it for 5 more minutes though - didn't seem that 20 minutes was enought and i think i could have done a few more. it is very soft, can't wait to cut into it~

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  62. Jessica .. .
    you can certainly put the icing on and freeze. The icing doesn't go bad in the freezer. My family likes icing on every slice so I generally freeze the loaves bare and then ice each slice.
    For company .. I put icing over the whole loaf. If you do put icing on and then freeze ..I usually set it in the freezer unwrapped for about half an hour so the icing sets. .and then wrap and freeze.

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  63. I come from a Mennonite background, grew up in a Mennonite town, currently live in a different Mennonite town - we all know Paska! However, this is the BEST paska ever!! I made the recipe the other day and all 5 loaves were gone by the end of the day! I did give away 3 and we ate 2 (there are 7 of us!). My neighbor "hired" me to make more for her gatherings this weekend after tasting the one I shared. I sent one to the church leadership meeting my husband attended the other day and they confirmed it was scrumptious! I currently have another batch rising and plan to make more tomorrow! Thanks SO much for sharing!

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  64. Hello Mennonite Ladies, I'm thrilled to have found your blog and am so happy to see that Mennonite recipes are not being forgotten. I will share my recipe for Paska Cheese Spread which uses quark from Foothills Creamery in Alberta - a very unique, tangy flavour:16 oz. quark, 1/2 c. butter, 1 c. icing sugar, 3 hard boiled egg yolks, 1 tsp.vanilla, 1 tsp. lemon juice. Combine everything until smooth. Enjoy and Happy Easter!
    Wanda M. Schellenberg, Vancouver
    P.S. Famous Foods sells this delicious quark.

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  65. Hi there,
    I read about your blog in the Vancouver Sun or Province a couple weeks ago and had to check out your Easter bread recipe right away. Well, I made it today and it's wonderful but I did bake for only 20 minutes and could probably used another few. It looked beautiful and golden on top but slightly underdone on the bottom.
    Thank you for the great recipe!

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  66. Wow. Baked it. Love it. Huge hit with the family. And the icing is great too. Yum! Thanks!

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  67. Thank-you Lovella for sharing this wonderful recipe! Today was the day and it turned out wonderful. I tweaked it a bit by using bread flour, adding 2 extra egg yolks (to color the bread a bit more), a 1-1/2 tsp of Fiori di Sicila flavoring (Italian, citrus-vanilla) and an egg-white wash topped with Swedish pearl sugar. My parents are icing fans, but I will be eating it!!!

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  68. When I use my Bosch machine, my paska does not seem as light. Is there something I should chang? Am I beating the eggs and sugar too long?

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  69. this bread brings back memories upon memories. my gramma used to make the loaves in small coffee cans so each of us kids could have our own every year!

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  70. My husband's family were able to enjoy this amazing bread with us this Easter. The result was a bread that was very moist, light and with just a hint of sweetness; the cream cheese icing that I made to go with it topped it all off wonderfully!

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  71. Yes, it's New Year's Day and I'm reading the recipe and all the comments all because I am fine tuning my recipe collection. To the many queries about this, that or the other if you make any other yeast breads and use a slightly different method use them for the Paska as well. The one thing that was drummed into me as a Mennonite girl was that the dough had to be really soft, softer than most other doughs, but still dough and not a batter. Altitudes, dryness of surroundings, etc all effect the moisture content of flour. As a result the flour amounts may vary substantially. Another factor is whether you fluff, stir, spoon or level the flour so if you can develop a feel for dough that is the best indicator. I love the icing as a spread. I will be using this recipe shortly, adding raisins, perhaps mixed fruits and have fruit bread. Though I look to some traditions I am a very untraditional girl.

    Comment on Mennonite traditions--many differences show up up based on the era of immigration and the original colony areas, if via Russia. I knew some of that from the great differences from our home to those of some of my aunts and uncles. I really didn't understand the reason until I researched history to get a better understanding of my ancestors lives.

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  72. I just made this recipe today for the first time. It was sooo worth the extra effort of peeling and then blending the mixture first. I made half the dough into mini buns and the other half made two smaller sized loaves. Next time I might do them all into small buns. The finished product is a delicously soft citrusy bun that is absolutly yummy! I couldn't keep something so good just to myself, so I brought a plate full over to my neighbor who recently had surgery. Thanks for another great recipe!

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  73. I can't wait to try making this for Easter this year. Thank you for sharing your treasured family recipes!

    Where did you find egg white powder? I would like to share a loaf with a family who has some health issues, to give them a "taste of spring" as was said before, but raw egg whites would not go over very well.

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  74. I can't wait to try this recipe in time for Easter. Thank you for sharing your treasured family recipes with us!

    Where did you find egg white powder? Is it the same as meringue powder? I would like to give a loaf to a neighbour who has some health issues within their household, and don't want to risk using raw egg whites. Thank you!

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  75. Teona. .yes you can use meringue powder in the icing.

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  76. Just getting ready to make this recipe for the first time...One thing I'm finding...we live in the Bahamas now (for work not vacation!) and the humidity is a factor in all of my yeast baking...Must adjust the flour accordingly and I don't know how to tell someone else to do that...I do it by feel!!!
    Also I'm smelling my hot cross buns as they bake right now...no little dough crosses for me...I'm too impatient! LOL!!!

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  77. Hi Gals: ...Bettye here.
    I've been enjoying your site for several years now and have a recipe for Paska Spread that I've used for years. It's a smaller recipe than is on the site and we really like it. From Altona Womens Institute - Canadian Mennonite Cookbook. Paska Cheese Spread..

    1 500 ml. carton dry cottage cheese
    1/2 cup butter or margarine
    3 hard boiled egg yolks
    1 cup white sugar
    1 tsp. Vanilla or other flavor you like

    Process all ingredients in the food processor or blender until creamy. If not creamy enough to spread
    a little sweet cream may be added. Store in sealable container in the refrigerator. Enjoy!!

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  78. Made my Paska today...the easiest, most delicious Paska ever!!! Humidity was high today so actually had to use 8 cups of flour...still have very light and delicious Paska! Thanks so much girls! And Blessed Easter everyone!!!

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  79. I made 4 loaves of this Paska today and they turned out perfect! I am having trouble with the icing though... I need a "method" since mixing the butter with the egg whites was a disaster! Even tried whipping the eggs the second time arounf. HELP!!!

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  80. Annoymus. ..about the icing. I just put the egg whites and butter and about 2 cups of icing sugar in a mixer and turn on with beaters . .go slow at first. .add more icing sugar and whip until light.

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  81. Tried out this Paska recipe this past weekend - and it was wonderful. I don't have much yeast-baking experience, so I'm always a little worried. But all turned out well. Thank you so much for sharing! Reminds me of all those Church Basement Sunday morning Easter sunrise breakfasts. Mmmmmm!

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  82. When I saw this recipe posted, I thought I would give it a whirl even though I had never made it before. My mother used to make wonderful paska and my memories kicked in of her taking these wonderful light breads out of the oven and placing them on PILLOWS (can you imagine?) to cool so they would not collapse. Now when I made these, I did not use pillows but my sister-in-law who has made this recipe, suggested a white fluffy towel. that did the trick.

    My mother died last year and baking paska was a wonderful reminder of her. thank you for the inspiration.
    Elsie

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  83. loishoch@gmail.comMarch 8, 2012 at 5:14 AM

    In the icing directions, should it say spread icing on each slice? Or on each loaf? I love this recipe!

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  84. Just took the loaves out of the oven....and it's JUST like I remember it when I was a kid. My mother's friend made it. THANK YOU! I often try recipes and then never comment or post about them, but this one is too good to not mention!! And the instructions are perfect~

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  85. Lovella
    I love this recipe and will make it again this year, it's better than Omas'was.
    My daughter needs Gluten free, has anyone tried that.
    Thanks
    Rich

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  86. Lovella - your recipe really IS famous you know!!!
    I don't know if this is the recipe that led me to your MGCC blog but it sure is one of my most favourite - it's becoming our Swiss Mennonite family's tradition now too.
    Hugs!

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  87. Lovella - your Paska recipe is famous for sure! I made it for the first time last Easter and think it just might become a "Swiss Mennonite" tradition in our home! I am forever thankful that I've found your MGCC blog site. It has greatly enriched my life and taught me so much.

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  88. Cannot wait to make this again this year! My mouth is watering at the memory of it!

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  89. You can also mix sultana raisins in the dough or any other nuts. Mix sultana raisins with little flour so they won't stick to the bottom.Paska icing: I mix whipping cream and icing sugar together, vanila that's it.

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  90. It is my first easter away from home. My boyfriends family is not Mennonite and have never tasted the delicious experience of Paska and since it is a tradition in my family I decided that this year I would make it myself. However...I have never made it before. I have never made any sort of dough required food before, not even cinnamon buns! I have watched my mom do it for years and have never done it on my own or with adult supervision. I am 25 years old and deathly afraid of baking Paska for my boyfriends family and sweet as pie grandparents! I really hope it works. It seems easy enough but we'll see. I'll keep you posted. *cries a little*

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    1. Oh I do hope you have fantastic results.....

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  91. This recipe sounds very yummy!!! Thanks Lovella!!!
    I have never made bread before...could I shape these into buns? and how long would I cook them for? Thanks so much for this WONDERFUL recipe site!!!
    Have a Blessed Easter!!!

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    1. Twyla, Yes..you most certainly can shape this dough into buns. I would bake them about 15 -20 minutes...or until lightly browned. As always...it depends on your oven and how big you make your buns and even on the kind of pan you use.

      Have a blessed Easter!

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  92. I am making your paska recipe for the fourth year in a row and it is rising as we speak :) I enjoy it fresh that same day and I have had success with baking half of the recipe and taking the other half of the dough & refrigerating the loaf pans full of dough before the second rise, then I let them rise for about a half hour the next day after taking them out of the fridge and they bake up nicely... that way we get fresh paska two days in a row :)Making this every year is a tradition that has been passed down through the generations that I am happy to continue :) Thanks for the great recipe!

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  93. I am making your paska recipe for the fourth year in a row and it is rising as we speak :) I enjoy it fresh that same day and I have had success with baking half of the recipe and taking the other half of the dough & refrigerating the loaf pans full of dough before the second rise, then I let them rise for about a half hour the next day after taking them out of the fridge and they bake up nicely... that way we get fresh paska two days in a row :)Making this every year is a tradition that has been passed down through the generations that I am happy to continue :) Thanks for the great recipe!

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  94. Thank-you so very much!!!

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  95. Thank you for the great recipe!! Super yummy!!! I riposted it with a few changes to make it a bit more on a healthier side :). http://annashomeandgarden.blogspot.ca/2012/04/paska-and-hot-cross-buns.html

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  96. Had kitchen renovation issues this year that delayed my baking until yesterday afternoon and today!!!
    The Paska is absolutely the best...even in a new oven!!! I made buns in muffin tins and then 3 loaves in old lard pans from my mom....smaller than regular loaf pans!!! Just awesome!

    Blessings to you all!

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  97. Hi Lovella,
    How was your Easter celebration? Mine was TERRIFIC due to your FABULOUS paska recipe...I did make the dough into buns and they turned out GREAT!!!
    Thanks very much!
    One thing to note is that on the website it tells you how much yeast, sugar and warm water to use, but when I went to print it out using the print friendly, the yeast mixture does not print with the recipe. Just thought I would let you know. Thanks again!

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  98. Made your Paska last week - my first time as an adult and I loved the lightness of the recipe. As I shared my Paska with extended family I was surprised how many people have negative memories of Paska because it was dry and dense. This recipe seems to capture the traditional flavor, but improve the texture.
    My mom always made Paska in various sized tin cans, but I couldn't recreate much of that that since coffee is now sold in plastic :(

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  99. Hi Lovella! Just wanted to let you know that your Paska recipe is Amazing!! My Mennonite Mother-in-Law said it was the very best she has ever tasted (and she wouldn't hand out a compliment like that unless she truly meant it.)
    Thanks SO much for sharing it!!
    gpen

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    1. Can I use fast rising yeast for this recipe?

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    2. You can use fast rising yeast with this recipe but I would mix it with the flour as instructed on the package.

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  100. Hi Lovella, just wondering if you think it would work to bake this recipe with sprouted Khorasan Wheat flour?

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    1. This is one yeast dough recipe that I have never tried with any flour but white. If you try it I would love to hear from you how it turned out.

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    2. After some research on Khorasan Wheat (and a whole batch of regular buns made with it that didn't turn out so awesome - dough rose but ended up with flat buns!) I'm back to let you know that regular white flour is the winner for Paska...I'm not going to mess with it! Khorasan Wheat is lower in gluten than regular wheat flour, and the gluten breaks down faster too so it's not good for yeast recipes that require significant mixing and rising. It IS a good substitute for cookies/brownies/muffins, etc. though.

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  101. Hi! My question is: do you have the dough rise at room temperature? I've heard of people having their dough rise in a warm oven (like 150 degrees). What do you suggest?

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    1. I'll answer for Lovella here. I do think that 150 degrees is too hot for a proper rise. It might rise quickly and fall. I would not go higher than 100 degrees. The best thing is to leave it in a large bowl,at room temperature (about 70 F) in a draft free place, cover it with a tea towel and plastic over top. The humidity created in the bowl with that is good. I have made it in a hot climate where the romm temp is about 90 F and you just have to plan on it risisng faster and not let it rise too long.

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  102. Looking forward to trying this Paska recipe for the first time, especially after all these rave reviews! One question...I don't have a normal blender, but do have an immersion blender. Would that work or has anyone tried it that way?

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    1. Nevermind...I tried it yesterday afternoon and it worked! Paska turned out beautiful and is so delicious! Thanks for this awesome recipe.

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  103. I haven't had Paska in years. My Grandma would use empty tin cans to make them in.
    They looked like mushrooms. I will make this for my grandchildren. Thanks for the recipe.

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  104. Thank you for this Paska recipe. I've never made Paska before because of all the fattening ingredients, but I grew up with it and miss it. I'm going to make this recipe this week, and from the comments I've read, I might even convince my non-mennonite husband to like it. Beth

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  105. Somebody mentioned that your Grandma added Instant Vanilla Pudding. At what point do you add it.

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  106. This is an awesome recipe. It turns out real moist and has a nice orangey flavour. I will be making this again.
    The only thing I did different is I added a cup of golden raisins. Thank you girls keep up the good work.

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  107. Never made paska before but have tried making buns recently which turned out great so I figured I could try. Just got home and it has risen to the point of almost overflowing the bowl! A good sign, right? Used fast acting yeast just in the flour so wasn't sure. Think I'm going to do bun form instead of bread. My kids like the paska/icing racio better.

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  108. I made mine today, it turned out wonderful! I can't wait to bring it to my parents in law tomorrow.

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  109. My paska is rising right now. I've made your recipe for the last 4-5 years. So good. Just curious though - the one I printed up from ages ago has a box of vanilla pudding mix in it. I see it's not on this recipe now. (Did I somehow add that myself!?) Just wondering! Thanks for all the yumminess over the years!

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  110. Hello Lovella - I am sure I asked this question a couple of years ago around Easter (we are Ukrainian so similar celebration bread for Easter) - I don't have a blender, however I do have a trusty Robot Coup (like Cuisinart) food processor approx 8 cup capacity. Do you think I could make this recipe in the food processor instead of blender?

    also - i have a Cdn Kitchenaid electric oven with convection option - i always use convection bake - do you have any pointers for using that type of oven (convection temp, convection time, etc)

    finally - have you ever made this in a circular pan? (like Angel Food type of pan)

    thank you - Margo
    from Greater Vancouver BC

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    1. Hi Margo, You can blend all the liquid ingredients in the food processor but I think I would add a bit less of the liquid to the citrus peels. The food processor bowl seems to lose liquid easier down the center post. Otherwise.. I would add the flour and knead by hand. The whole recipe would be too big to finish in the processor.
      Convection ovens work well for yeast breads. Bake 25 degrees less than conventional.

      Baking in a circular pan would work just fine.

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  111. Hello Lovella - one more question - about WHICH YEAST --- i went to the IGA supermarket and they have the Fleischmann's product line - which one do I buy?

    the instant one - or - the traditional one? (I don't understand what the difference is)

    also - i notice that on the ENVELOPE of yeast - it says 2 & 3/4 TEAspoon (ie not 1 tbsp) per envelope - I suppose I could use almost all three of the little envelopes (I don't need a whole jar as we don't normally make bread at home)

    Here is the website for Canada http://www.breadworldcanada.com/productline/productline.asp

    once you are able to post an answer - then the experiments begin (and my walking plan too ; )
    thank you again - Margo

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    1. Margo, use 2 tablespoons traditional yeast, not instant yeast. Open all the envelopes and measure it out.

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  112. Hello Lovella - well, I have the yeast (my previous question) - all nice and fresh from the market - now i have one more question - because - i had no idea that the supermarket would have so many different flour options 'til I was bewildered by the display at our IGA - let's go with Robin Hood (because I know that brand here in BC, Canada) - now what? Do I use the unbleached, all-purpose white flour - the type i'd use if i was making cookies or pastry? Or do I need to use the "bread" flour?

    ALSO - are the sprinkles on the icing - is that traditional? I read thru the comments here - and not sure about that.

    Thank you for your patience re: my questions - I can make great soup but nervous about baking ; )

    - I hope you're enjoying your early signs of spring out there in the Valley. Margo.

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    1. Please let me know which type of Brit Columbia flour to buy for this recipe - there are so many Robin Hoods in our local IGA Marketplace here in Coastal BC. Do I specifically need to buy BREAD flour (some say bread machine - I am doing this by hand - I don't even own a stand mixer) ------- or can I use the simple old-fashioned (now ; ) ----- all purp white flour - by Robin Hood brand. Thank you in advance - and happy daffodils out there in Bradner. Margo.

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    2. Hi Margo,
      I am not fussy about what kind of flour I buy here in BC. I have bought unbleached flour or have often just bought the kind on sale. As long as it is not whole wheat or any of those variations or cake and pastry flour you should be fine.
      I often buy all purpose white flour by Robin Hood so that would be a great choice for you too.

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    3. thank you and what a spring day in beautiful BC. A rebirth.
      I shall go back and look at the market tomorrow

      I noticed they even have a 'robin hood' brand "BLENDING FLOUR" ------- what is that for?

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  113. Hi Lovella,
    I am visiting your site and this recipe after I saw an article on Easter Bread with a link in my local paper. I think this is the closest I have come to finding my grandmother's recipe for paska ever! I am very excited to try it! She used to make hers in a vertical round pan -- I even think I remember her using a coffee can, so the bread looked a bit like a mushroom. Is this doable with your recipe?
    Thanks,
    Joan

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    1. Hi Joan,
      I'm so happy for you to have found this recipe which will bring sweet memories to your kitchen of your grandmother. You can certainly use a coffee can as long as it does not have the white lining inside the can that many cans have now.
      I have found some cake pans that are similar in shape that will give the mushroom shape you are remembering.

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  114. Sooooo.....You don't recommend instant yeast...? Can you just add the yeast to the flour and then make sure the proper amounts of liquid are in the mix? Hmmmm? All I have is Baki-pan Fast-rising Instant yeast.... Guess I should wait, eh? till I get some other yeast?

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    1. Hi Becky, Sorry.. by now you have gone to get yeast. I use the yeast at Costco that is probably somewhat in between instant and regular. It is fairly fine granulated. I think instant would be okay. I just never buy instant. but if you do, just add it to the flour like you normally do.

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  115. Hi! I was just wondering if you made the small paskas on the photo in muffin tins? Thanks!
    Dorothy

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  116. Would you recommend icing the bread prior to freezing it or would it be best to freeze, thaw when needed and then ice? I have made it just one day in advance so I will be pulling it from the freezer less than 24 hours after it's been baked. Also, I am pregnant and therefore would like to avoid the raw egg whites in the icing. Do you have an icing recipe alternative? thanks!

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  117. Just finished my second batch of this year's Paska. I apprenticed with my grandma many years ago to learn how to make a good Paska. One trick she taught me was to just chop up the lemons and oranges and puree them until fine in the food processor. It takes away some of the work. BTW - I made my first batch last week with old yeast and I shouldn't have. This week's batch with a new jar of yeast is completely different and heavenly. Good advice about always using fresh - I am writing that in my recipe! Happy Easter - Tina.

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  118. I found your recipe and made it the other night....our house smelled so divine..... I ended up with 3 good sized loaves, and we took one to my brother's for dinner last night.... I would definitely make this again....thanks for the great recipe....

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  119. Hi Lovella! Its my firt time making Paska!! I used meringue powder instead of egg whites, the icing is nice soft, but seems a bit fluffy. Not shiny and smooth like your picture. Could it be the meringue powder? it looks like you could pour your icing on, or is the texture supposed to be thicker like a soft cream cheese spread? Can't wait til it comes out of the oven!!

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    1. The smooth shiny icing is just for decorating. We spread the real icing on each slice. The decorating icing is simply icing sugar, milk and a bit of corn syrup to make it the right consistency.

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