Tuesday, December 16, 2014

Chocolate Cinnamon Crinkle Cookies using Ten Thousand Village Fair Trade Ingredients

 In today's post I'm featuring Fair Trade baking essentials from Ten Thousand Villages.

I received a box in the mail a few weeks ago which contained a gift set from Ten Thousand Villages. The gift set contained Camino Cocoa, Golden Cane Sugar, cinnamon, and a few little novelty items for the kitchen all wrapped up in cellophane. I played with a recipe I had received years ago from a co worker for Chocolate Crinkle Cookies, adding Fair Trade cinnamon, and double dipping the cookie dough balls in Fair Trade cane sugar and then powdered sugar before baking.

Chocolate Cinnamon Crinkle Cookies
Yields 4 dozen cookies
  • 1/3 cup butter, room temperature
  • 1 cup brown sugar
  • 2/3 cup Camino Cocoa
  • 1 tsp baking soda
  • 1 tsp cinnamon
  • 2 egg whites
  • 1/3 cup sour cream
  • 1 1/2 cups flour
Sugar cinnamon for rolling cookie dough balls:
  • 1/3 cup Camino Golden Cane Sugar
  • 2 tsp ground cinnamon
  • 1/2 cup powdered sugar
  1. Beat butter until creamy. 
  2. Add brown sugar, cocoa powder, baking soda and cinnamon. Beat well.
  3. In a small bowl whisk together egg whites and sour cream. Add to first mixture and beat well.
  4. Add flour and mix well. 
  5. Turn cookie dough out onto a long piece of wax paper. Shape dough into a long snake. Roll wax paper around the dough and place in the refrigerator for one hour.
  6. Cut 'dough snake' into thin slices that when rolled up make into small balls. 
  7. In a small bowl mix together the 1/3 cup Camino Golden Cane Sugar and the cinnamon.
  8. Put the 1/2 cup powdered sugar in another small bowl.
  9. Dip and roll the cookie balls in the cane sugar and cinnamon mixture and then dip and roll in the powdered sugar. (see note)
  10. Place dipped cookie balls onto parchment lined baking sheets. Bake at 350º for 10-12 minutes. Remove immediately while still hot to cooling rack. 
NOTE: Dipping first in the cane sugar and cinnamon helps the powdered sugar to not melt into the cookies when baking and also helps the baked cookies to maintain the snow looking powdered sugar. 

Ten Thousand Villages is a great place to shop in store or on line. Perfect for Christmas gift giving.


  1. Those cookies look amazing, and I like Ten Thousand Villages, too. Such interesting things they sell.


  2. Oh wow! I love this post for so many reasons! First of all because its Kathy - and we always bake/cook very similar, and must be kindred spirits (reference to Anne of Green Gables). These cookies are similar to one of our family favourite. I really like your tips for rolling in the cane sugar before the powdered sugar to try and keep the "snow" look. I will try that. I also really like your method of dividing up the dough - I usually use a cookie scoop, but this would probably be even faster. I am always on the look out for "kitchen hacks" (aka short-cuts) to speed up the process or to do something in a less than conventional way. Is the cane sugar coarse?

  3. Kathy - these look fabulous! Such a great idea to make up a Ten Thousand Villages "Baker's" Gift Basket. I must remember this! Thanks for this great tutorial on Crinkle Cookies.

    1. Hi Rosella - We've done a lot of the hard work for you. Check out our gift bundles, including one for the Chocolate Lover and two for the home baker!

  4. I am extremely impressed along with your writing abilities, Thanks for this great share.

  5. This perfect for special occasion, must share recipe to everyone :)
    see also: http://goo.gl/Y9NovV.

  6. Just noticed this. In step 5, don't you mean to shape dough into a long snake? (not a "long snack"...although that would be some snack.)

  7. In step 5, it says to shape dough into a "long snack." I think you meant a long "snake", yes?

  8. I made these Christmas Day. They tasted great and were a big hit. However, the dough was very sticky and hard to handle. Next time I will try increasing the flour to 1 3/4 cups and see if that makes it easier to work with. P.S. In step 5, I think you meant long snake (not long snack) although some people do like to "snack" on the dough!