Saturday, September 7, 2013

Saturday in Bev's kitchen

Freezing Corn
7 of us Mennonite Girls live here in the Fraser Valley 
where Chilliwack is known far and wide for its excellent corn.
At this time of year you'll be seeing a lot of posts featuring sweet Chilliwack corn,
 both here at MGCC as well as on some of our personal blogs.
Today I have a couple of tips for freezing corn.

  • Husk the corn cobs, removing the silk.  I don't get too worried if there is a bit of silk left among the kernels - it just tells my family and friends that the corn they are eating was fresh from the farm.
  • Place in a large pot and cover with cold water and add 1 Tablespoon sugar and 1 or 2 tablespoons of lemon juice. I have a tall soup pot that I use and I find I can get a good dozen cobs in it if I stand them on end.
  • Bring to a boil.
  • Have a sink full of ice water ready and when the pot boils, drain the hot water off and plunge the cobs into the ice water.
  • Remove from the water once they have cooled down.
  • Get your freezer bags ready by marking them with the date.
  • Using a cutting board set into a large baking pan, and a sharp knife, stand a cob on end and cut the kernels close to the cob.  Set the cobs aside but don't throw them away yet.
  • Take the "naked" cob, stand it up on a plate and run the blade of your knife down the cob.  This will strip all the leftover bits of corn on to the plate.  I then bag this juicy goodness separately and mark it to use for corn chowder later.
  • Place into freezer bags, remove as much air from the bag as possible and close tightly.
  • Place bags in freezer and enjoy summer goodness long into the winter.
For other suggestions for freezing corn, see Marg's post on creamed corn.








17 comments:

  1. Thanks for the hints on corn. I can remember freezing corn with my Mom. My comment is about that beautiful plate though!!!! It looks like a beautiful piece of quilting fabric. Do you know the maker and pattern? Thanks!

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    1. Yes, what is that pattern? Lovely.

      And the corn. What a good idea for that bag in my fridge. I love to make a corn chowder, and even put corn in my fish chowders.

      Sharon

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    2. I bought the dishes in boxed sets of 4 4-piece settings at "Think Kitchen" last year and then was delighted to find additional pieces at our local Home Sense. The plates in the set were round but the plates at Home Sense were square ones and they had all the serving pieces as well. On the bottom of the plate it says "222 Fifth" 'Gabrielle Cream'. It's a fairly inexpensive set and I really like it.

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  2. Nothing tastes better than homegrown sweet corn from the freezer, heated, seasoned and served with browned butter!!! This is one of the first years that we didn't plant sweet corn, too much galavanting on the West Coast in June (smile), and I miss it terribly!!! We have lots at our local markets thankfully!

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  3. My trick this past summer was to put the cob on top of angel food pan (The tube part) And as you cut the corn off the cob, it falls into the pan. It worked pretty good and less splatter over everything.

    Ang N.

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    1. Years ago when I did a lot more freezing and canning, we used the angel food tin trick as well. I had a "corn cutter" then - a round cutter set between 2 handles. You would stand the cob on a nail that stuck up through the middle of the angel food tin and then set the round cutter on the top of the cob and push down on the handles. The corn came of the cob like a dream. I've since misplaced the cutter so it's back to using a knife!

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    2. You can buy the corn husker at " bed bathroom and beyon"

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  4. This is what I spent yesterday afternoon doing! Today is Salsa Saturday and tomorrow has dill pickles on the agenda... I love this time of year!

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  5. Electric knives are pretty handy too! Never heard of a corn cutter and the angel food cake trick. I am going to have to improve my game for next year!

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  6. What is the purpose of the lemon juice?

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    1. I'm not sure - it is advice that was given to me and I've just done it without questioning it. Anyone have an idea what the lemon juice does?

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  7. It is this time of year, corn boils and mussel harvests. Thank you for sharing, love the colours and photos.

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  8. Use the back of your knife for scraping the cobs. You won't dull your knife and it works just as well. :)

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    Replies
    1. Thanks, Carlene - I think I used to use a table knife to do it.

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  9. Thanks Bev!! You make it sound pretty simple. I've never tried it before but I think I'll give it a go this year. We have some lovely fresh corn that we can get from a farm nearby.

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  10. This is the first year I put corn in my freezer. By propping the cooked and cooled cob vertically in the center of a bundt cake pan and running the circular de-cobing tool down the cob, all the kernels fell into the pan beautifully and made bagging and clean up a breeze. Thanks for all of your wonderful recipes. I recently made up your buttermilk and mayo salad dressing recipe. It was scrumptious!

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  11. Bev. when I freeze anything, I use a drinking straw to remove the last pockets of air.... you have to be quick ! smf

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