Saturday, April 7, 2012

Plumi Moos

I chose this recipe for this Easter weekend because Plumi Moos was often served along side a ham dinner on Easter Sunday in many Mennonite homes. This may bring back some memories around your family Easter table. I remember eating this at my Grandma Janzen's house. You can serve this 'fruit soup' warm or cold. It's a really nice addition to a potluck or buffet table. 

Ingredients:
  • 10 cups water
  • 1 cup white sugar
  • 1 cup prunes, cut in half
  • 1 cup raisins
  • 1 cup dried apples, diced
  • 1/2 cup dried apricots, cut in half
  • juice of half a lemon
  • 1/2 tsp cinnamon
  • 1/3 cup cornstarch
  • 1/4 cup water
Method:
  1. In a large pot bring water. Add all the chopped fruit. Turn to a slow boil and cook for 10 minutes.
  2. Shake together cornstarch and remaining water until you have a smooth paste. Stir into water and fruit. 
  3. Add remaining ingredients and continue cooking at a slow boil until fruit is soft, and the moos begins to thicken slightly. The total cooking time should be no longer than 30 minutes.
Plumi Moos can be served immediately, or re heated later. You can let this fruit soup cool down and then place in a sealed container in the fridge to get really cold. A nice serving suggestion is to place moos in a large glass serving bowl with little fruit nappies to dish it into. 

24 comments:

  1. Oh my gosh, I haven't thought of this for years. We just called it fruit soup and we always had large tapioca in it. I have no idea where our recipe came from. Yummy stuff!

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  2. Traditional recipes like this are so wonderful. I have never had this but it sounds delicious and makes sense that it was a "winter" fruit dessert with the dried ingredients. "Nappies" is what my mother called her little fruit bowls too.

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  3. A rush of memories here! I too had an Oma Janzen. My mom always added some red jello for colour.

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  4. This is the closest recipe I've found to what my mom and Grandma made (and I make now). They never added cinnamon or lemon juice though and it was always finished off with heavy or whipping cream.

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    1. Indeed it was always "finished off with heavy cream!"

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  5. Happy Easter to all of you!

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  6. Yes, this is part of our easter dinner tomorrow as well and will be made by one of the MGCC(Bev). We also add the red jello to give it a rich colour. Happy Easter to all!

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  7. really, really good with ice cream. And if you're really adventurous, try maple walnut. YUM

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  8. Haloli...hier nennen wir es Rotegrütze und wird mit Eis gegessen oder pur.Delicious!Schöne Ostern fest für dich und deine Familie.Jesus lebt!Bussi.Luciene.

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  9. We had this at our Easter gathering just yesterday!

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  10. We're having it tomorrow as well. We also often have it at Pentecost with a cold meal. Happy Easter, everyone! He is risen! Hallelujah!

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  11. shirley reimer bertheletteApril 7, 2012 at 12:35 PM

    Happy Easter to you, I also have had this sooo good,,

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  12. That,s exactly the recipe that my mom made. I can tell our mom,s were friends. I have just not seen this one posted before. Thank you...looks excellent.

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  13. Glad to see you used the cornstarch---one side of the family would use flour--the other cornstarch--I always considered this the more Russian Mennonite way!

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  14. Our family always called it Pluma Moos :) We use flour AND cornstarch. Instead of cinnamon, we use star anise. We always had it at Christmas, not Easter. My great grandparents were from Kazakhstan and Uzbekhistan. Happy Easter anyway--and now I might have to make Pluma Moos!

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  15. We too called it Pluma Moos and I hated it! Won't be making it, but this does bring back old memories so thank you for this.
    Tracy

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  16. Looks just like the kind Mum made. She must have learned from Grandma Janzen, although I don't remember ever having it at her house. I remember her borsht (spelling?), though, and her fabulous dill pickles. Always the dill pickles. Thanks for the recipe.

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  17. We had this too but called it Fruit soup----never heard the term Pluma Moos. sometimes we had dumplings served with it. What are "nappies"??

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    1. Nappies are small little glass bowls.

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  18. Love it! Thanks for posting an old family favorite - my Oma canned it, but would you happen to know the shelf life for it? I'd ask her but she'd probably say "it lasts forever" haha...

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  19. After its cooked can it be frozen to eat later?

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  20. oh how i loved this my oma Driedger made it with cherries ...sigh..

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    1. That would make it kjoacha moos. My mom would make both at Christmas.

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  21. Oh memories of moos...as a little girl, I thought that the prunes were the "mice", but being too shy/polite to ask, I could never figure out how gramma made them taste so good...

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