Friday, December 26, 2014

Lopsha - Russian Noodle Soup Flashback Friday

For Flashback Friday I'm re posting this peasant soup that we grew up with called Lopsha in Russian at our house and in our Russian community.
This soup (Lopsha) is made is made for large church gatherings. I have recipes to serve 200-250 people. They make their own noodles using 20 dozen eggs, 60 lbs. flour and 1 lb. salt, then make a stock from 35 lbs. of soup bones and 350 lbs of choice (kosher) beef. Usually Lopsha is served at funerals and Borscht is made for Weddings. This is basic Russian Peasant Village Fare. I’m giving you a very simple quick recipe.




All you’ll need is store bought (or home made) Chicken Broth and Jewish very fine egg noodles. (Manischewitz or similar)

Bring the Broth to a boil.

Add as many noodles as you like, but remember they expand while cooking. When the noodles are cooked the Lopsha is ready. Adjust your noodles as to how thick you like your Lopsha. If your soup gets too thick for your liking just add some more broth.

If you want a little more interest in the soup you can add cubed potatoes and carrots to the broth to cook them before you add the noodles. If you want those carrots and potatoes to be a lot tastier saute them in a little olive oil, salt and pepper before you add them to the broth. Happy memories!



After all our holiday eating of rich foods this would be a nice meal.

17 comments:

  1. I love Chicken Noodle soup .. .it's fascinating to me how our cultures mesh. . my parents immigrated from Russia but were never conisdered Russians becuase they were Mennonites who immigrated into Russia from the netherlands. . .anyways.. .it is fascinating how many of our foods are similar. . .I guess because they had neighbors like your family. . really cool

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  2. Love it...and we don't have a 'chicken noodle' soup recipe here yet either...so now we have a very 'ethnic' one indeed. My mom used to make all her own broth and even the noodles...YUM! But they were the thicker variety and something I would not venture to do...too much work. Although I make my own broth I like the idea of using store bought broth...I always keep some on hand anyway.

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  3. Thankyou so much for your support and for taking the time to comment on Debbies blog. Everyone has been so kind. Best Wishes Mandy

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  4. I used to and still do make a chicken noodle soup for my family in the winter. Long ago it was because it would feed a lot of hungry kids and now, because we just like it. Mine is more than noodles and stock. It is carrots, onion, potatoes, celery, broth, chicken and any leftover veg in the fridge. Now I use the No Yolk egg noodles. Have to watch the cholesterol these days.

    I really like reading your recipes.
    I'm not Russian or Mennonite but you girls really can cook.

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  5. Now if only I liked chicken noodle soup..I must be one of the few that don't.
    My Mom used to make her own right from scratch to finish..even butchering the old hen!!

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  6. My MIL was the queen of homemade noodles...and now I am hungry for a bowl of homemade chicken noodle soup. Thanks for sharing your recipe, Ellen.

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  7. I was surprised to find your site when I did a search for Molokan Paska Bread. I was raised in the Russian Molokan church in Los Angeles nick named "Big Church." Our services feed anywhere from 500 to 1000 people at long picnic style tables that filled the main room and a side room, and occasionally outside in the parking lot. I left the Molokan church in 1969 shortly after my mom died. Your recipes bring back some great memories and I will be back to try more very soon. In my poor phonetic Russian "Dyboak vom dasrovia." God bless you. Manya

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  8. Thinking Lopsha an extinct Russian tradition once the generation of immigrants passed on, I tried the Internet and found you. As a small child in the 1940's I recall attending a funeral (wake) on Petrero (Russian) Hill in San Francisco with my folks (Russian dad, Irish mom. While the rest of the mourners gathered in the main hall and Dad touched bases with old friends, Mom took me to the kitchen where we watched men adding beef bones to enormous vats while women in babushkas (bandanas) and white aprons rolled out paper-thin sheets of dough to be sliced into noodles for the Lopsha. I left before I could see the extra meat added later, which explains the rich, wonderful flavor of the noodles we ate in white bowls seated on benches at long linen-covered tables. I'll bet you have some wonderful feasts. So nice you've kept this tradition alive and I plan to make it from scratch, in smaller batches, this winter.
    Kathleen (Katya)

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  9. I just pulled out the same book from 1973 and thought I'd do a quick search to see what I could find on the internet. Here you are.

    My family were the Semenoff's, who lived two doors down from the Molokan Church in S.F.

    I know that 250 person recipe!

    The beef they use is boiled and served with cabbage and carrots as a separate dish during services.

    Do you remember their original wedge salad too?

    They soak the beef in water overnight to remove the salts and 'other impurities' (according to grandpa - who is still around) before boiling. Then they transfer the beef to a different pot with fresh water and boil it. It is the broth from the boiled beef that is used as the broth for Lapsha there.

    I make Lapsha, Cabbage Rolls, Pedishki and Shishlik all the time. All from recipes learned
    from Babushka and Jedishka.

    Thanks for posting this. Now, where's that recipe for blintzes and pelmeny. :)

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  10. This was really delicious and filling. I had to make it twice though because the first preparation I did was just for me and my brother but then the folks got home early and they made me cook it again. No biggie, I love cooking for my family. great recipe!

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  11. It looks wonderful and I love basic dishes like this. Plus the health benefits at this time of year can't hurt either! Thank you!

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  12. Lopsha..Wow, I so happy to see this, I also grew up on this my great uncle made this all the time...My mom's family came from Karrs Russian migrated to Los Angles then to San Francisco My grandmother was born in Russia and one great Uncle they then left and came to Untited states...My mom has passed on in March and now the family home is left to me. Which they bought in 1913.. this is so cool to see this. brought much memories for me. Do you make piroski. My grandma made them and baked them in the oven... with love Janice

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    1. Yes, Janice, we make piroshki, too. I'll post my mom's recipe with different fillings in the future.

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  13. My in-laws have a Russian heritage and my mother-in-law makes lopsha with noodles and milk (and no vegetables). Funny how recipes are passed down from generation to generation and yet are usually slightly altered.

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    1. Lorrie, we have a Moloshni Lopsha, too, that is milk based!

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  14. THIS LOOKS SO GOOD. I LOVE SOUP'S AND STEWS. I SEE YOU ARE SERVING IT FROM A PFALTZGRAFF "YORKTOWN" COVERED DISH. I HAVE BEEN COLLECTING THIS PATTERN FOR FOURTY YEARS. I WILL BE SERVING MY LOPSHA FROM MY "YORKTOWN" SOUP TUREEN. THANKS SO MUCH FOR THIS SIMPLE RECIPE.

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